I Game and I Vote

Before Aussies vote in the federal election for 2010, GameSpot AU guides you through four election-worthy topics for gamers.

by

Attention Aussie gamers! The 2010 federal election is just around the corner, and while the mainstream media may think it's covering all the big issues, it's neglecting one very important topic: which major political party has the best policies for gamers? In this GameSpot AU feature, we check in with the Labor Party, the Coalition, and the Greens to gauge their views on four important gaming-related issues in an effort to help you decide who will get your vote on August 21. We're also going to help you make your voice heard, with an e-mail form that you can send directly to your current Federal member letting that member know you're a gamer and you're an important part of the political spectrum. So read on to find out each party's views, and then head on over to our automated form to send your letter and get politically involved!

It’s a tough job convincing politicians to change their minds, but Aussie gamers have done it. Issues like R18+ for games are now on the political agenda thanks to the efforts of the local gaming community, who have worked together with industry bodies like the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (iGEA) and the Game Developers Association of Australia (GDAA) to make their voice heard.

But the fight is not over just yet. A federal election is just around the corner, which means gamers must work harder, faster, and more united than ever before to put the issues that matter to them in the public forum. Things move quickly in politics: what’s important today will be forgotten tomorrow. Policy makers must not forget how important gamers are to the cultural landscape of Australia. Gamers have to engage them in debate and remind them of what will matter to them most come polling day.

In this feature, GameSpot AU has highlighted four key issues for Aussie gamers: the fight for an R18+ classification, low broadband speeds, the threat of the proposed Internet filter, and the struggling Australian video game development industry. We handpicked ministers from each of the three major political parties--Labor, Liberals, and the Greens--and asked them what specific pledges they can make in regard to these four issues ahead of the election. All this is designed to help you make an informed decision on who gets your vote.

At the end of this feature you will find a letter template outlining each of the four issues. This letter is meant for your local member. Complete the blank fields, and follow the instructions to send the letter on. Local members are required to reply, so this is the best way to ensure that these issues are flagged. Remember, a collective voice is the best way to make sure that what gamers have achieved so far does not go to waste. Ultimately, it's you who must make sure this all counts for something. It’s the only way forward.

THE ISSUE: R18+ for games in Australia

Australia remains one of the only countries in the Western world without an adult classification for video games. This means that any video game rated above an MA15+ rating by the Classification Board of Australia, the industry body that rates all material and content in Australia, is refused classification (RC) and effectively banned for sale locally.

In order for the R18+ classification to be introduced, all state, territory, and federal attorneys-general must unanimously agree to its introduction. To date, this has not happened. A public consultation into the issue was released in December 2009 and closed in February 2010. A preliminary report into the results of the consultation showed that 98.2 percent were in favour of introducing R18+ for games. The Federal Home Affairs department is currently reviewing the consultation. According to Federal Home Affairs Minister Brendan O'Connor, classification ministers have requested further analysis of community and expert views before a final decision on R18+ for games can be made.

Below are the classification questions we posed to the respective Labor, Liberal, and Greens ministers. Their responses follow.

Do you support the introduction of an R18+ rating? Why/why not?
Will you be making mention of this issue throughout the upcoming election? If so, how?
What will happen to this issue should you win government? Will you advocate for change or do you see it as something that is not of particular importance when considering the big picture?

Fallout 3 was initially banned in Australia before being reclassified.

Minister for Home Affairs, Brendan O’Connor:

"This is a matter for classification ministers and an agreement must be reached that satisfies all states and territory governments before changes can be made to that nation's classification system. The strength of arguments on both sides must be considered. What is needed is the right decision, not a rushed decision.

"At their meeting on 7 May 2010, the Standing Committee of Attorneys-General released a status report on the consultations. The report shows that about 60,000 submissions were received and that approximately 98 percent supported the introduction of an R18+ classification.

"That report showed polarised views for and against an R18+ classification. Classification ministers agreed at that meeting that further work needs to be done before a decision can be made, including ascertaining the views of the silent majority. It is not just the weight of numbers that need to be considered. It is also the strength of arguments on each side. Ministers are aware of the support for the proposal shown by the number of submissions received. However, they are also aware of the wide range of views on this issue in the community.

"Ministers have made a commitment to discuss the issue at a future meeting and have requested further analysis of community and expert views to better understand the arguments on each side."

Manhunt was initially released in Australia in 2004 with an MA15+ rating, but it was later banned for sale.

Shadow Minister for Tourism, the Arts, Youth and Sport, Steven Ciobo:

"Earlier this year, the federal government concluded a consultation period following the release of a discussion paper on the inclusion of R18+ games in the National Classification Scheme. The government has committed to providing the Coalition with a copy of the submissions received as part of this consultation period.

"On behalf of the Coalition, as the shadow minister for the arts, I received a formal briefing from departmental officials from the Attorney-General's Department following the release of the discussion paper.

"It is important to note that a change to the National Classification Scheme requires unanimous agreement among Australia's censorship ministers. Any change to the National Classification Scheme must now be considered in the context of the feedback the government received as part of the consultation period.

"The Coalition is committed to engaging with all Australians on this issue throughout the election campaign."

Left 4 Dead 2's violence had to be toned down for its Australian release.

Australian Greens Senator for Western Australia, Scott Ludlam:

"The Greens support the introduction of an R18+ classification for video games in Australia. We believe that it is time to change the system. It is bizarre that Australia is one of the only countries in the Western world without an adult classification for games. We believe that a change to the classification system should occur in the next term in parliament.

"The Greens will continue to support a campaign for R18+ for games. We also believe that the games industry and gamers have done a really good job of highlighting the issue and putting it on political agenda. We're going to play our part in parliament and the community to make sure people know about the issue. We plan to raise this issue during our upcoming federal election campaign and make sure it is part of the debate." Click on the Next Page link to see the rest of the feature!

THE ISSUE: Faster broadband speeds

Australia's national broadband network is one of the slowest and most expensive globally. A recent report comparing the Internet speeds and costs of the top 30 nations in the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) Broadband Rankings shows that Japan, Korea, Finland, Sweden, and France are leading the pack, with average broadband speeds of 61 megabits per second (Japan), 46 megabits per second (Korea), and 22 megabits per second (Finland).

Australia ranks fourth to last at number 26, with an average broadband speed of around 1 megabit per second.

To gamers, broadband access is a critical component of the gaming experience. Having a fast, reliable, and cheap connection in Australia will mean that things like online multiplayer matches and downloadable content will no longer be a headache for gamers.

In April 2007 the Australian government announced that it would establish and build a new high-speed national broadband network. The latest government estimates, released earlier this month, predict that the newly named National Broadband Network will take up to eight years to be fully rolled out. The government plans to spend up to A$43 billion in total to make Australia's Internet up to 100 times faster, aiming to deliver speeds of 100 megabits per second.

Below are the national broadband questions we posed to the respective Labor, Liberal, and Greens ministers. Their responses follow.

Do you recognise that slow broadband is a big problem for Australians?
If elected, what specific pledges can you make regarding:
Increases in average speeds for both urban and regional Australians
Increased accessibility in both urban and regional areas
Lowering broadband costs for the average Australian

Australia's broadband speeds are among the lowest in the world, with an average of around 1 megabit per second.

Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Stephen Conroy:

"Australians have had to put up with expensive and slow broadband for too long. That is why the Australian Government is delivering the National Broadband Network (NBN).

"The NBN is the largest nation-building project in Australia's history and will lift Australia to the top of world rankings in broadband access. It will drive major productivity and growth opportunities and ensure our children get the best education in the world.

"The NBN will deliver high-speed broadband to all premises in Australia, no matter where they are located. Every home, business, school, and hospital will be included and no one will miss out. Under the NBN, 90 percent of premises will be connected with fibre-to-the-premises technology providing speeds of 100Mbps. The 10 percent of Australians who live outside the footprint will receive faster and cheaper broadband from the next generation of satellite and wireless technology. These services will deliver on and exceed the Rudd Government’s election commitment.

"The NBN is not a quick fix for an election: it is a solution for the long-term benefit of the country, including our rural and regional areas. The first services of the NBN will begin in Tasmania in a couple of weeks."

The National Broadband Network (NBN) could take up to eight years to be fully rolled out.

Shadow Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Tony Smith:

The Federal Opposition was unable to send us details of their broadband policy before publication. Opposition spokespeople have told GameSpot AU that their official policy on this issue is still to be officially announced but will happen before the conclusion of the 2010 election campaign. We will update this section as soon as they send us policy confirmation. Previously, the Coalition has stated its opposition to the government's proposed National Broadband Network.

To date, Telstra has had a monopoly position in Australia's broadband network, sending prices soaring.

Australian Greens Senator for Western Australia, Scott Ludlam:

"The Greens believe the current government recognises that this is a problem for Australians. They probably didn’t have gamers in mind when they planned the NBN, but it's a big step forward regardless. The fact that Telstra has been brought back into government control will make it easier for competition at retail level: more ISPs in the market means a more dynamic environment for broadband services.

"We think our role going forward should be a government watchdog. A very large portion of taxpayer's money is going into building the NBN, and we think it's our job to make sure that the government is accountable with this money. We are also advocating for the NBN to be rolled out in rural areas of Australia before it makes its way to the capital cities. We think the government is slowly doing this with its announcement of initial testing in Tasmania, but at the same time we are disappointed to see that little attention has been paid to WA.

"We also see it as our job to make sure the NBN rollout process is transparent and will not end up privatised. The reason for high broadband costs in Australia to date has been the fact that Telstra has had a monopoly position, and they charged whatever they liked. We think it's important to have the NBN in the public's hands.

"If the Opposition wins power after the election, we believe the NBN will be scrapped. The Greens and the Labor Party have both worked hard to reach this point. The final hurdle will be the privatisation issue: the Greens are proposing that before a move is made to privatise the NBN, a public interest test and a vote in parliament should be carried out." Click on the Next Page link to see the rest of the feature!

THE ISSUE: Mandatory Internet filter

In 2008 the Australian government proposed a mandatory Internet filter that would force Australian Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to block access to Web sites that include content which has been rated "Refused Classification" (RC) by the Australian Classification Board. The Australian Communications and Media Authority will maintain a "blacklist" of URLs that will be blocked by the filter.

Late last year the government announced that the policy would not apply to video games until the minister for Home Affairs has completed the consultation process into whether Australia should have an R18+ classification for video games.

A recent survey of 1,000 Australians found that 80 percent support the introduction of the filter. At this point, legislation to introduce the mandatory Internet filter has not yet been drafted. Earlier this month, the Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Stephen Conroy announced a number of modifications to the filter policy, including a delay of at least a year while the government reviews the RC category of content, which the filter would block.

Below are the questions we posed to the respective Labor, Liberal, and Greens ministers about the proposed mandatory Internet filter. Their responses follow.

Please outline your position on the introduction of the mandatory Internet filter.
Do you believe it is necessary? If so, why?
Why do you believe the Australian people have responded so negatively towards this?
What can you say to those whose online gaming experiences will be affected negatively by the filter when it is introduced?
If elected, will you support or block plans for a mandatory Internet filter?

The proposed mandatory Internet filter would force ISPs to block Web sites on the government's "blacklist."

Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Stephen Conroy:

"The government does not support RC content being available on the Internet. This content includes child sexual abuse imagery, bestiality, sexual violence, detailed instruction in crime, violence or drug use, and/or material that advocates the doing of a terrorist act.

"Under Australia's existing classification regulations, this material is not available in news agencies, it is not on library shelves, and you cannot watch it on a DVD or at the cinema or on television. RC material is not available on Australian hosted Web sites.

"The Australian government has a comprehensive A$125.8 million Cyber Safety policy, which includes education, law enforcement, research, and ISP level filtering. Whilst most of the media coverage focuses on the ISP filtering component, there is far more to our policy than this, including providing A$49 million for 91 new police officers to the Australian Police Force Child Protection Unit to continue their work in surveillance and uncovering people who groom children through chat rooms, or distribute child sexual abuse content; providing additional funding to the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions to pursue legal proceedings against these offenders; funding numerous education activities through the Australian Communications and Media Authority outreach program; and funding research into cyber-bullying and other aspects of cyber-safety to ensure we can take an evidence-based approach to the issues.

"In relation to ISP filtering, there are two components: mandatory filtering of Refused Classification material (because this is content that the government believes has no place in a civilised society), and providing a grants program to encourage ISPs to offer wider levels of filtering on an optional basis to those families who wish to receive such a service.

"The policy does not apply to X18+ material and will not block any material that is not RC. The government's proposal will bring the treatment of overseas hosted content into line by requiring ISPs to block overseas content that has been rated RC.

"The government announced on December 15, 2009, that the policy would not apply to video games until the minister for Home Affairs, Brendan O'Connor, has completed the consultation process into whether Australia should have an adult rating for video games."

Labor has spent $49 million on recruiting 91 new police officers to the Australian Police Force Child Protection Unit.

Shadow Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Tony Smith:

The Federal Opposition was unable to send us details of their views on the mandatory Internet filter policy before publication. Opposition spokespeople have told GameSpot AU that their official policy on this issue is still to be announced, but will happen before the conclusion of the 2010 election campaign. However, Shadow Treasurer Joe Hockey has told media that the Federal Opposition will scrap plans for an internet filter if it wins the federal election. We will update this section as soon as they send us policy confirmation. Keep checking back with GameSpot AU and this feature for the latest on this topic.

If elected, the Greens would block the filter in favour of more resources for law enforcement.

Australian Greens Senator for Western Australia, Scott Ludlam:

"The Greens oppose the introduction of the mandatory Internet filter. If it is ever brought up in parliament, we will vote against it.

"What we have found is that the more people know about the filter, the more likely they are to oppose it. It's all in how you ask the question. If you ask "Do you think we should block child pornography?" then most people will say yes. However, if you explain the government's filter proposal, then people realise that it will not work in blocking the kind of material the government wants to block.

"The government is already a year behind schedule with the filter; they’ve even taken it off the table during the election because it's so toxic. To their credit, this idea of a 12-month review of the RC category is a good idea. They should look closely at how classification works in Australia, including how video games are classified. This will also give ISPs space to introduce a voluntary scheme, and will also buy the Cyber Safety committee time to finish their work and come up with alternatives on online literacy.

"The Labor Government will still introduce the filter if they win the upcoming federal election. However, it is up to the Coalition; if they choose to block the legislation in parliament, it will not pass.

"If the Greens were in power, we'd use our influence in the Senate and in the community to come up with some better ideas. We are interested to move towards alternatives to the filter. The broad outlines of what we need are clear: home-based and school-based filtering, voluntary filtering and more resources for law enforcement and research into what the real hazards for children are." Will these four issues affect the way you vote? Let us know by leaving your comments below!

THE ISSUE: More government support for Australian video game development

It’s no secret that the Australian video game development industry has seen better days. It has been plagued by continual job cuts, studio closures, and a massive loss of revenue in the past two years, and only a generous helping hand from the Australian government can put it back on its feet again. The Game Developers Association of Australia (GDAA)--the industry body that represents Aussie game development houses--has been campaigning for government help since 2007, asking for the same 40 percent tax rebate that the government extended to the film development industry in the 2007 federal budget. The GDAA says this support will result in an additional A$25 million in new investment into Australian-developed games, something that the local industry desperately needs to survive. The rebate would also enable Aussie developers to reduce development costs, something that could help attract more international publishers and inject new life into the local industry.

In 2010, the GDAA has changed tack in approaching the government for help. With the help of Screen Australia--the body that looks after the local film development industry--the GDAA has begun working together with the Minister for Environment Protection, Heritage and the Arts, Peter Garrett, to seek more support for game developers. This year Garrett announced a review of the Independent Screen Production Sector, promising to look at the issues raised by the GDAA. The GDAA and Screen Australia have both put in separate review applications to Garrett’s department, calling for a hybrid model of the original tax offset specifically for the games sector. The review process will continue after the election.

The government has good reason to invest in local video game developers. According to independent market research group Gfk, the Australian game industry cracked the A$2 billion revenue mark last year, growing by 112 percent since 2006. The GDAA reports that there are now more than 50 game development companies in the country, with more than 200 titles developed locally. If the government introduces the rebate scheme for games development, we could very well see these numbers doubling in a very short period of time.

Below are the game development support questions we posed to the respective Labor, Liberal, and Greens ministers. Their responses follow.

What is your official stance on helping the game development industry and introducing the same rebate as the film industry or other tax breaks?
Why do you think this support has not yet come from the government?
Do you think it is important to nurture video game development talent in Australia, given that the local games industry made over A$2 billion last year?
In what ways will you support the Australian video game development industry should you win government?

Transmission Games closed down in late 2009, despite well-received releases like Heroes Over Europe.

Minister for Environment Protection, Heritage and the Arts, Peter Garrett:

"Our department met with representatives of GDAA on two recent occasions, in February 2009 and April 2010, to exchange information about issues identified by the GDAA and relevant initiatives of the Australian Government.

"The minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Stephen Conroy, convened a Digital Games Industry Roundtable in October 2008 involving local and international companies, industry associations and relevant government agencies to examine ways to enhance the contribution of the games industry to the economy. The government is committed to supporting Australia's creative industries, including software development and interactive content. Australia's creative industries are an important sector of our economy contributing A$31.1 billion in industry gross product in 2007-08.

"The government has dedicated new funding of A$17 million over four years to establish the Creative Industries Innovation Centre under the Enterprise Connect program to support the productivity of our creative businesses, including eligible games companies.

"The government is currently progressing new legislation to enhance the Research and Development Tax Credit. We are also undertaking a Review of the Independent Screen Production Sector and will consider issues related to the screen industry raised as part of that review, including those related to the operation of tax incentives and the issues raised by the GDAA.

The review will report to the minister by the end of 2010."

Aussie studio Blue Tongue was responsible for the critically acclaimed de Blob.

Shadow Minister for Tourism, the Arts, Youth and Sport, Steven Ciobo:

"The Coalition recognises the importance of Australia's dynamic game development industry. Our video game industry has shown tremendous growth with sales increasing 47 percent to A$1.96 billion over 2008. Importantly, the industry employs 1,600 Australians.

"Australia has more than 60 game development companies developing world-class games for Australians and our export markets. More than 90 percent of industry revenues are export revenues.

"Of course, many Australians enjoy playing computer games. I note that 88 percent of Australian households now have a device for playing computer games."

[Editor's note: Steven Ciobo cannot make a further comment in specific regards to his department's plans for the Australian video game development industry or comment on specific department policy until after the election.]

Aussie-developed Flight Control was a worldwide hit on the iPhone.

Australian Greens Senator for Western Australia, Scott Ludlam:

"Of all the creative industries in Australia, we believe the video game development industry is one of the most neglected. This is bizarre given that video games now make more money in this country than the box office. Video games are not a well-understood medium, and not a well-represented one in Australia. The politicians who are writing the budgets in Australia are not gamers themselves, and thus they do not understand that gaming has a legitimate place in the Australian cultural landscape.

"The Greens believe that the video game development industry should be entitled to the same 40 percent tax rebate scheme given to the film development industry. We're supportive of the industry. We understand they are still formulating their proposal and we look forward to working with them post election." Click on the Next Page link to see the rest of the feature!

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Discussion

146 comments
AceBalls
AceBalls

Well, stuff it anyway. It's a hung parliament and we may be back to the voting booth in a couple of weeks. This time I'm going to drop a turd in the ballot box on my way out.

ddt88
ddt88

It's funny how the Liberals are unable to provide the details of their policies at the time of publication. It's because they don't have any policies to provide.

scan12
scan12

You people are kidding yourselves if you think these issues are actually important in the national context. I'm as big a gamer as the next guy, but to even consider basing your vote on these factors shows an extremely underdeveloped view of the true issues facing the country. At the end of the day, gaming is a hobby, and while it may be important to us, to actually suggest that it should be any sort of significant contributing factor as to who gets our vote would be to inflict a fairly significant blight on our collective intelligence and maturity.

Crunk_Dog
Crunk_Dog

I'm in agreeance with a lot of you, I think the Greens should be running the country, both Labour and Liberal are just making a mess of things. Each time one announces a policy, the other opposses it, the only time that they agreed on something was on helping the American troops in Iraq and Afganistan. Hopefully Australia does get an R18+ for games soon, I don't even have a reason anymore, we just need one:P!

triple_punse
triple_punse

A surplus is better than a deficit mate. I liked it when stuff was cheap and the aussie dollar was strong. I can live with a few more homeless people on the street, heck most of them are homeless cause they never helped themselves to start with. Half of them could join the army or do something productive where you dont need a brain. Better then labor coming in and raping all us actual working population to give to all you dodgey poor buggers.

AceBalls
AceBalls

A surplus eh? Have you ever wondered how the Libs got that in the first place? They raped the entire nation and finished us off with cleaning out our super, topping it off with a credit crunch right at the end of their term. Don't forget the homeless rate went up dramatically whilst they were in power.. and if they come in again, we'll be seeing more of that. They will do nothing for Education and Medical. They don't even have a plan for the economy. It's all a big "we'll see how she goes" attitude that is just not good enough. I hope the Independents steer clear of this Abbott monkey.

AceBalls
AceBalls

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

AceBalls
AceBalls

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

AceBalls
AceBalls

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

Fatal-Chaos
Fatal-Chaos

@flaylover I agree with you, you can't trust Labor, but people are giving you the thumbs down because you're spamming, not because you're wrong. I think i'll get them soon aswell, iv'e made 3 comments in like 4mins lol.

Fatal-Chaos
Fatal-Chaos

@crashish Labor have done jack all to fix the internet, and who cares about it anyway, there are more important things then faster download times. The only reason people (teenagers) want faster download times is so they can download porn at a quicker rate. Pathetic, you idiots would choose internet + deficit over a surplus for the economy...

Fatal-Chaos
Fatal-Chaos

Can't trust the greens, i'm sure they would bring out a R18+ classification but that doesn't mean they know how to run the country.

johnnyauau
johnnyauau

Out of the three parties, The Greens stands out. No gimmicks, no trickery, it's totally straight forward. The Greens better put the R18+ for games issue on the table with Labor and Liberal Party.

HeftySmurf
HeftySmurf

There was a hilarious sex party worker at the Bourke Street public school (electorate of Sydney); she kept on harrassing this poor Liberal voter who didn't have a voting sheet in his hand. I took the National Broadband Network policy into account with my vote, but gaming overall had limited importance. My ability to buy R18+ games at EB in an age where digital and physical distribution are neck and neck is just not an issue of particular significance to me. I am far more concerned about policies to address education, infrastructure and the environment and I challenge anyone with a scrap of perspective to demonstrate that marginally more convenient access to certain games outweighs them. Having said that, I probably shouldn't be surprised if I'm shouted down. I've followed too many attempts at conversation in the trade channel on Khaz'goroth to believe that there aren't people that feel their unrestricted right to computer games outweighs the future of their children.

AceBalls
AceBalls

I just got back. Took an hour at lineup but it was fun. A guy threatened to urinate on a Liberal pamphlet if the volunteer gave it to him. The volunteer didn't of course lol. Vote Greens at number 1 and Labor at number 2 if you're a gamer. Once the Greens get knocked out, they're votes will go to Labor. If the Greens gain more seats in the House of reps and Senate, they can overthrow all the stupid net filter plans and anti-R18 decisions.

AshTray1986
AshTray1986

It sure is getting crowded up on the fence... I'm sorry but just because Greens back the idea of R18 games does not mean they are getting my vote. While it is an issue I am watching, its not the most important, hypothetically if our country went into a downward economic spiral due to the wrong policies and action or lack there of, how is me playing a violent version of Left 4 Dead going to help? What's scary is that GS is posting almost seeming to try and to sway votes, in my opinion, is dangerous. Surely economics, education, health, security, etc are more important. I'm actually a little disappointed to see this article, its not that it was brought up, its the way it was brought up. "...gauge their views on four important gaming-related issues in an effort to help you decide who will get your vote on August 21"

triple_punse
triple_punse

I already have decent internet downloads...

Kirnl
Kirnl

Labor wont get the internet filter passed anyway no one else wants it liberal says NO the greens say NO thats it done and done it wont happen even barrack obama questioned it most powerful man in the world Google creators are against it like 3rd most powerful people in the world

pamelakd
pamelakd

For those concerned about the idea of the Australian broadband filter, most of the policy on that comes from a man named Stephen Conroy. There is a website set up called http://filter-conroy.org/ which basically wants to do just what the name suggests... Filter Stephen Conroy from government, rather than letting him filter our internet. No matter who you choose to vote for, there are voting guides showing how you can do it below the line, and hopefully help to filter Stephen Conroy out of parliament. Check it out if the issue is important to you. :)

crashish
crashish

@ triple_punse without labor. you wouldnt be getting decent internet downloads or better lines. liberals say they're goin to put some in. but why stop what has been started?

crashish
crashish

go the greens. lol. if only bob brown go to be PM. lol.

Kevi_dog
Kevi_dog

@ JESSEAARON100 Australia is way better than malasia, are you for real?

themovi3nut
themovi3nut

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

JESSEAARON100
JESSEAARON100

I am lucky to be a Malaysian My country is a free country and i feel sorry for the people who live in Australia :(

DezmoTk
DezmoTk

If you havent heard, the Shooters & Fishers party has supported gamers from the very start, helping spread the R18+ papers around. Maybe an alternative if you dont like the Greens.

triple_punse
triple_punse

Even if the nbn goes ahead, telstra will be the only company getting it which is reason enough to say no. QLD has been ruined by a labor government, our roads, health system and all the bs scandals.

triple_punse
triple_punse

coalition never wanted internet censorship. that was all that pathetic labor and their doing

Siddysss
Siddysss

@beau_x, dont be naive, you have censorship in america

beau_x
beau_x

I'm very thankful to be an American. First Amendment FTW. The idea that the government can censor and ban video games "for your own good" is so contrary to the idea of freedom, it's almost unreal.

The_Frederick
The_Frederick

Please note that the Coalition is almost definitely against the Internet censorship plan now.

AceBalls
AceBalls

Vote Greens and vote Sex. Labor and Liberal don't care about gamers at all.

Decazz
Decazz

flaylover please stop posting here...you are illiterate and your political "viewpoint" is riddled with blatent bias and incorrect information

flaylover
flaylover

@Roo6339 sorry didn't see your post and whoever said i wanted to do politics just giving my view point and the grammer i do computer brail and i know what your going to say how do you play games if your blind thats my problem

flaylover
flaylover

@Acid_Kenobi yep and if labor gets in i won't be able to do this anymore with there filter so why not now lol and calm down it's just politics

Acid_Kenobi
Acid_Kenobi

@ Flaylover I'm a big fan of free speech and all that sh*t, but shut the f*ck up!

Roo6339
Roo6339

@flaylover... See this little dot here? "." It's known as a full stop and it makes what you write legible. If you want to appear smart and get involved in politics, try and make your posts readable.

conpanbear
conpanbear

@ flaylover - I feel it's more of a discussion, really :) To say that Greens will just go along with whatever Labor says is pure speculation. There are subjects that they disagree on (i.e. same sex marriage, population control) and Sen. Bob Brown is passionate about his policies, so he's not just going to backflip to keep the ALP happy. You make it sound like they're in cahoots! I'm not entirely sure what the UN has to do with this debate, either. 192 countries in the world don't mind the UN enough to be members (by the way, that's including Australia, who have been a part of the UN since 1 Nov. 1945 - the Liberals have had plenty of time in power to cut ties, if they so wished).

flaylover
flaylover

@conpanbear yay an argument love it ok true true i didn't expect anyone here would be smart enough to look anything up ok well greens have never had the balace of power but they have had the chance to over rule and and double elect in the labor party but did they nope what i'm trying to get at is during an election the greens go aganist the labor and liberal plans and sorta make there own but if labor wins they say labor has great plans as seen when rudd came in and in the past when labor lost the greens say they had great plans it's just fishy to me Capitalism works - doesn't mean I have to vote for The Liberal Party it does when a labor goven has weird idea at the moment labor loves the UN now do some moree research for the history of the UN and you will see that arn't as holy as the labopr and even obama say they are and a vote for the green is a vote for labor means any greens that wins seats will support anything labor wants even if they denied it during the election

conpanbear
conpanbear

@flaylover I'm not sure if I follow. I've tried to look up some data on the Senate, and I can't find anything about the Senate being full seated by The Greens. It seems that of the 76 seats in the Senate, The Greens have 5 of them (http://www.aph.gov.au/Senate/senators/homepages/index.asp?sort=party) - the highest number they've ever had in there. Also, there are no Greens in the House of Representatives (that's 0 out of 150 seats). I don't think this country could ever be at risk of being communist, especially whilst under the Queen as part of the Commonwealth. Capitalism works - doesn't mean I have to vote for The Liberal Party. Furthermore, I was under the impression that "a vote for the greens is a vote for labor" doesn't apply if you vote below the line, does it?

flaylover
flaylover

any i live in nsw witha laber state goven that is always screwing us over and getting in trouble for stealing money from the treaserly and you wounder why i won't trust labor hawk put us in debt + howard put us in the green again + rudd put us back into debt + julia buy water that does not exit see the pattern here i honestly think this labor NBN promie will fall through it wouldn't be the first time and before pple give me thunmbs down give me your arguement if you have one and are just cranky you know i'm telling the truth

flaylover
flaylover

[This message was deleted at the request of a moderator or administrator]

conpanbear
conpanbear

To those of you saying that The Greens wouldn't be able to run the country, what are you basing this on? Just wanted to know, because other than never having had a Green PM, I can't really think why they couldn't...? Seems like shooting them down before they ever have the chance to prove themselves.

ensomneac
ensomneac

Whoever said fibre to the home would be outdated and is too expensive is mis-informed. Yes, it's a lot of money, but it's an investment which will set Australia up. And it's far from outdated. Fibre is at the speed of light, and can be ramped up when technology improves. Anyway, if being eventually outdated prevented us from building things, nothing would get done. Personally, I think none of the parties deserve to govern, but I prefer Labor because I desperately want the NBN to go ahead. I already have 120GB month at 20 MBps, but it's not about me, it's about the future of Australia.

langrisser2005
langrisser2005

The Greens are full of crap, only saying what you wanna hear!

flaylover
flaylover

SOAP WOULD NOT VOTE LABER LOL

flaylover
flaylover

oh yeah amd you pweople loving on the greens they say alot that sounds good but even when they owened the sen nothing ever happened they are all talk really

flaylover
flaylover

oh and my word for the day don't vote for who you think is the best party because there are none vote for who ever will do less damage example even tho howard made some bad choice he build a strong econemy which is why he got voted is so many times rudd was treated like a celeb and the best thing to ever happen and he started turn us isto a UN ass kissing commie loving country in less then one term and julia kicked him out but is doing the same tony even tho i don't like him real he is still safer for our free world life stye everyone hate private ect but look and the countrys that don't have it... 3rd world indeed

PerilousWolf
PerilousWolf

@BDL91 The greens pretty much. Pro NBN, R18+ Anti Filter or the australian sex party. same thing, but also against political correctness :D

flaylover
flaylover

@BDL91 i know right my sister pulled out the old dads dialup that he still pays for lol and she could run WOW on it or so she told me anyway well judging by this the greens but we know how annoing they are but tony abbot of the libs said last night he would deffenelty look into R18+ for games soooo....