Feature Article

How Thief Is Returning to Its Stealth Roots

Once more, with stealing.

by

Since its public reveal at the Electronic Entertainment Expo last year, Eidos Montreal's Thief reboot has been constantly dragged over the coals by devout fans of the 15-year-old iconic stealth series. Such reactions were sparked by a perceived modernisation of the reboot's mechanics at the expense of the earlier games' core values. What are these quick-time events doing in a Thief game? Why do I earn 40 experience points for a headshot in a game about sneaking past enemies?

Eidos Montreal responded to the backlash by cutting QTEs and XP entirely, a decision that the developer was already leaning toward internally. "We realised that it was breaking the economy system," Thief's game director, Nicolas Cantin, tells me. "It was not encouraging the stealing aspect of the game."

For a game called Thief, that meant something was seriously wrong. So, after playing through the first five hours, I can confidently say the decision was right. Thief is a much improved game since I last played it, because it is now entirely concerned with the act of stealing.

I'm not just talking about mission objectives, or side quests in The City's vast Victorian hub world. See, before Eidos Montreal cut them, experience points were used to acquire certain upgrades. Now, everything simply costs money. Every arrow in Garrett's quiver, every upgrade to increase the damage of his nonlethal blackjack, and every new piece of leather to bolster his defences require the spending of coin. Because additional resources are almost nowhere to be found in missions themselves--which is a significant change from the previous games--failing to stock up from a vendor in the hub world before taking on the next job leaves Garrett very few options in a tight spot.

Garrett earns this scratch lifting valuables whilst becoming embroiled in a deeper, darker mystery involving the death of his young protégé, Erin. Fans of the third game in the series, Thief: Deadly Shadows, will recall that game ending with Garrett meeting a young girl who, as is heavily implied with references to Garrett's own street orphan origins, will go on to become his apprentice. With Eidos Montreal's reboot picking up this exact plot thread, I couldn't help but wonder: is this new Thief actually a direct narrative sequel to Deadly Shadows?

"It's more reboot than sequel," Cantin replies, cryptically. "We don't say necessarily that it's the same girl. But we all know the end of Deadly Shadows, so, yes, there's a big link to be done there."

Overly snarky, predictably reckless, and thoroughly unlikable, Erin gets herself fridged--killed off to fuel Garrett's angst--by gate-crashing a weird summoning ritual tended to by old people in robes, whilst Garrett hits his head trying to save her and winds up with amnesia.

After five hours, the plot doesn't get much better. Third-person cutscenes constantly break your perspective and work against the sense of immersion Eidos Montreal is adamant it is working hard to instil. Excruciating dialogue from Garrett, such as when he visits the game's signature horror level and wonders aloud, "Is it the asylum that's haunted, or me?" doesn't help. I can't yet see what Eidos Montreal is going for. Cantin tells us that this Thief tells a "more mature" story, but the only evidence of that so far has been characters using actual profanity instead of "taffer," along with a nudity-heavy mission in a whorehouse.

Turn from butts to buttresses, however, and you'll find that Eidos Montreal's take on The City is rendered with an attention to detail never before seen in a Thief game. Most impressive is the heavy smoke choking the streets, like a Victorian-era industrial sprawl caked in eternal smog. We almost wanted to get ourselves checked to be sure we didn't come away with the plague.

The City is rendered with an attention to detail never before seen in a Thief game.

Yet for all its graphical splendour, moving through The City is problematic. Eidos Montreal has eschewed a traditional jump button in favour of a sprint button that makes Garrett automatically climb up certain surfaces and objects. The problem is that not everything can be climbed. We understand why; Garrett isn't about Assassin's Creed-style parkour. See, as detailed as The City is, so much of it is visually similar. Therefore, the environmental cues that communicate what can be climbed are difficult to parse. This is compounded by the fact that Garrett can't climb over certain objects that look traversable, such as certain railings or stacks of crates. The developer has put significant effort into making the act of fleeing from the guards tense and thrilling through the use of dramatic music and fantastic first-person camera work--until you stop dead in your tracks because a box or small brick wall cannot be scaled. It makes me desperately miss having a jump button.

Some of this environmental readability is solved with the use of Garrett's focus ability. This is a new suite of mechanics for the series--and, of course, another source of fan outcry. Focus allows Garrett to supernaturally augment his perception and reactions to get out of a tough situation. In practice, the mechanic is extremely similar to the instinct mode that made its way into Hitman: Absolution. Enemies and key objects (including specific wall grating that can be climbed up) are highlighted in blue, and actions like lock-picking can be sped up by expending focus when performing them. In a pinch, it allows Garrett to quickly disable guards and make good his escape. Focus is another system that can be upgraded by spending coin, eventually allowing Garrett to slow down time and see enemy footsteps through walls. This provides options that players less familiar with the traditionally high difficulty of stealth games may seek refuge in.

It's a tight line Eidos Montreal is walking, trying to appeal to fans without scaring others away. As one of those fans, I was pleased that focus could be completely disabled and the game finished without ever using it. In fact, the number of customisation options the developer provides is phenomenal. Almost all of the HUD can be disabled, from waypoint markers down to the crosshair and health meter. A custom difficulty option lets you apply classic Thief gameplay restrictions, such as no knockouts and no alerts. There's even an ironman mode that deletes your save file upon death. Having played using the standard settings, as well as with focus and all the HUD assist elements turned off, I feel the latter provided the superior, more immersive experience.

Thief is not a game for those who prefer a combat-oriented approach.

Applying these classic restrictions adds a score multiplier, which feeds into online leaderboards. It's a first for the series, allowing you to compete to see who can steal the most valuables, and who can do it the most silently. Eidos Montreal is also announcing a challenge map mode; though they're mum on the details, they tell me it's similar to the way the maps worked in Batman: Arkham Asylum, offering small and self-contained stealth challenges.

This leads me to believe that, with Thief, Eidos Montreal is attempting to offer something for almost everyone--both Thief first-timers as well as hardcore stealth fans. The developer appeals to the former by introducing new mechanics and onscreen assistance, and satiates the latter by allowing them to switch all that off. Newcomers to the stealth genre may want to experience a unique power fantasy without necessarily being challenged too directly, whilst old-timers demand classic hardcore Thief, or else they'll start tying the nooses. I'm not ready to say whether Eidos Montreal has succeeded in either endeavour, but I can say for certain that Thief is not a game for those who prefer a combat-oriented approach. Trust me, you will die. This is a stealth game through and through--one whose mantra of "stealing to survive" has never been more apt.

Discussion

193 comments
Paoksis
Paoksis

its fine with me if they manage to satisfy both casual and hardcore gamers,but this is always risky and tbh i'm kinda doubting how they can actually make a game from casual to hardcore and vice versa with a few setting changes

Freboy
Freboy

It seems to me as if the big problem with this game is summarized here: "Eidos Montreal is attempting to offer something for almost everyone--both Thief first-timers as well as hardcore stealth fans."

No game NEEDS to do everything. For acrobatics, there is Tomb Raider and Assassin's Creed. For 1st person role playing, there is Elder Scrolls. Thief needs to be Thief. A game about sneaking and avoiding guards. 


It's such a pity... every memorable game becomes that, because they really GO for that special niche. Then the IP becomes a big money maker, and the publisher wants to make it into a block buster, and every special feature has to be toned down to make it more like Call of Duty or God of War or whatever other similar game has sold many copies. And so Dead Space becomes less scary... Ninja Gaiden gets filled with QTEs... Resident Evil becomes completely linear... even fucking Army of Two gets rid or Salem and Rios, the only thing that gave that game some character.


So of COURSE they are trying to blend some Elder Scrolls, Assassin's Creed and Dishonored into the formula. Just to make sure that Thief is bland enough.

elbcen
elbcen

Can I just say that I love the critical perspective that the author of the article takes here? I like how he pointed out that the third person cutscenes took him out of the experience, and it really is something to consider, though I am sure that Eidos is aware of that and working on it like he mentions here.

I am still excited for the game. I have never actually beaten any Thief game, but I have played Deadly Shadows and The Dark Project and found them to be very well designed games. I am definitely excited to see what Eidos has in store for us with this game, and I am glad that the XP and Quick-Time events were removed; it just shows that they don't want to just cash-in on a popular franchise.


I hate reboots, though only because they squander the creative freedom that designers have when working with a new IP. There is never a chance to satisfy the older players, and there will inevitably be conflict between old players and new players as a result.  Still, if this turns out well, I'd still be happy to get my hands on it.

dpclark
dpclark

Garrett = floating camera with arms.  No thanks.

beamzor
beamzor

I liked the XP system. Lame that they dropped it imo.

Snepstok
Snepstok

The highlighting system worries me.

Like the video says, it often breaks immersion and diverts from the atmosphere and graphics. Like in Dishonored: a drab colored vision and annoying static sound take you out of the world. Useful to find loot, but it gives you a '3D-model/computer feel'

I hope Eidos thinks of something better. 

It should be possible to find loot in a natural way, right?

GunEye
GunEye

I don't know why so many people complain about cinematic cutscenes . I personally really love cutscenes in all games. I've always found them fun and entertaining when exectured properly. In old DMC games, they were something I was waiting for all level long. In Final Fantasy it was a time to sit back and watch the show. It felt rewarding!

In Thief - cutscenes were sudden, un-expected, chilling and breath-taking.

And the pre-view is WRONG: Thief games HAD cinematics mid-game. Like in Thief 2 in the level in the woods when you meet Victoria for the second time. The level wasn't over, and you continued after the cutscene.


The videos in Thief1&2 were very special - since they were done with REAL silhouettes of people. So in the Victoria video you could actually seen the nude/half nude shape and curves of the actual real person actress. Of course it was all shaded.

When Garret spoke with Artemus, it was two actual people talking, a real live action scene. And the artistic water-paint videos at mission brief and de-brief were great.


I just hope they make they new videos and dialogue right. And I hope they brought back briefing by Garret, some quotes at the start and stuff.  These were epic, chilling and memorable.

GunEye
GunEye

Thief couldn't come any sooner. I honestly can't wait for this. All hail the first and true high king of stealth games. The game that defined Stealth as a genre.

Imperiusmax
Imperiusmax

Meh a pure stealth game is boring. I already have plenty of more entertaining choices.

daviz88
daviz88

meh.....i think i will pass. not a big fan of first person stealth especially when games like ARKHAM CITY, BLACK FLAG, BLACK LIST and coming soon GROUND ZERO offer what i need from the genre 

razrabbit
razrabbit

I know they're focusing on detail, but everything just looks too bright and 'clean'.

I hope everything i've seen has been purposefully altered to look brighter and prettier just for the sake of previews.

If the entire game is like that, its gonna be pretty shitty.

Sozialminister
Sozialminister

I read previews from Thief fans who were very disappointed with this reboot. So I dont get why Gamespot claims it goes back to its stealth roots. Bribery? I am very suspicious of american reviewers these days.


After Hitman: Absolutions was a slap in the face for every hitman fan, I have not much trust in this one either.

cboy2332
cboy2332

Right now no jumping is the only negative news that left for this game, so I'm excited about this now. As a big fan of thief series and Deus Ex series, I support Eidos Montreal.


And it is really confused me because I think most people love DEHR(the player score in GS is 8.6), but from the comments here give me the impression that there are so many people hate it. So can anyone tell me if DEHR is hated by most of you, or some people leave comments here are that kind of "Old Fan" who hates new game with no reason( or want to show "how old they are")?

prats93
prats93

The Dark Mod is a better Thief game than this.

shermenz
shermenz

With that stupid "super-vision" being shoved into everyone's throat, I really appreciate the fact it can be turned off.

More so, I didn't care for this game. Now I'm interested.
It looks fun, and they seem to have cool looking mechanics.

Looking forward to seeing more about this one.

stealthyninja81
stealthyninja81

I have to say I think this will be a decent game like Hitman Absolution was a decent game, not bad but not very memorable and not worthy of its predecessors.

vadagar1
vadagar1

For some reason I imagined Daniel  wearing nothing but that mask in the end.... he is a nice looking guy after all...


Sorry Dan :P but if you look good you have to suffer the compliments ;)


and why is my type bold?!!!

komuchen
komuchen

After this, waiting for review with the score 4/10

electronic_eye
electronic_eye

Very poorly conceived article in my opinion. With the title, "How Thief is returning to its stealth roots," I am confident most readers expect to hear about the positive changes the developer is making to the game. What naturally doesn't fit then with this premise is that half the article is a misguided personal rant about different aspects of the game the writer doesn't like. We shouldn't be hearing about his opinion on the story or the dialogue in an article like this. Thief isn't out for another month; if you're going to attempt to write an early review, then make that loud and clear in your title and for God's sake put a possible spoilers warning in the heading! Otherwise, stay on topic.

DigiRave
DigiRave

Ok, I just read the article - I watched the video earlier and thought everything was alright at the time, I was actually really looking forward to it - and now I think the studio has a lot they need to fix.A lot more than can be fixed in a month. Maybe they do need another 6 months, although I hope not.  I'm very disappointed now.  I really hope they fix the problem with climbing boxes, railings and other objects, it's complete bullshit.

WraistlinGill
WraistlinGill

I've heard that each game is tracked at the point-of-sale system and somehow is able to be tracked if the individual game was purchased.  If the game doesn't get processed through a store's POS system (i.e. sold), and then it's detected on either PSN or XBOX Live as being stolen, you get a special award of some kind.  (Ok, I totally made that up.  I, in no way commend the act of thievery.)  In all seriousness, I've got hope for this being the reboot that Thief has needed since Looking Glass was at the helm.

Zoglac
Zoglac

I really wish wish people would lighten up. Do people honestly expect this game to be identical to the old games? If you long for the old days, there are hundreds of fan-made missions to play.


Honestly, I love the old games to death, and I'm just glad to see it come to next-gen at all. All things considered, this game is translating the formula as well as one could possibly rationally expect in this modern gen.


It's like when I see people complain about Deus Ex: Human Revolution. No, it's not exactly like the old games, but it's way more "Deus ex" than anything else in the last ten years. Unless I'm mistaken, it's the same developer making this game, and they have already shown their willingness to listen to what fans want.


Seriously, Thief-fans, even if is bad, it's not as if it personally affects you; you don't even have to buy it. We have three great games already.

Paoksis
Paoksis

@Freboy  yep...many examples,like assassin's creed which had assination missions,now has economic system and naval battles or dead space where the first entry was space horror game,3rd one was gears of war space opera

majorbuttache
majorbuttache

@Snepstok You know you can disable those off right? Along with the focus ability etc. and even add more difficulty to the game with custom difficulties.

elbcen
elbcen

@GunEye  I think the key here is 'third person'-cinematics. I didn't see the video and just read the articles, but the other Thief games had cinematics that were like visual-novel panels, and they were very quick and almost always focused on the mission at hand. Rarely did cutscenes break up the actual gameplay sections (I believe that was the case in Deadly Shadows), and for the most part the rule was that when you are in control of Garret, you remain in control of Garret until the end of the level. At least, that's how I understood the criticism. 


Also, I agree that cutscenes in Final Fantasy and Devil May Cry are always fun to look forward to, but in games like Hitman or Thief, you just want to be left feeling tense, and that tension comes only from pure gameplay with rare breaks. In fact, I would say that Thief is a hard game to play for hours on end for the first time through just because you feel constantly worried that your plan of infiltration is not perfectly planned out yet. You suddenly hear footsteps from around the corner, and you tense up so badly that I would often just press the escape button to get a break for a second. 

If I'd get the feeling that there's a cutscene coming up, I wouldn't be too worried because I'd always be able to predict the breaks in tension, and that would ruin that key-emotion that makes Thief so incredible.

dhindes
dhindes moderator staff

@Sozialminister The notion of this Thief returning to its stealth roots is in reference to the developer removing mechanics that pushed it away from stealth in previous builds.

elbcen
elbcen

@cboy2332  Bluntly put, Deus Ex Human Revolution is a little like DmC: Devil May Cry. The game itself is great on its own, and I would have enjoyed them a lot if they were the first part of their respective series. However, as parts of their respective series (sequels, no less), they offer less gameplay features than their prequels, and that's sad and disappointing. That's why I couldn't help but feel a little turned off by DEHR. 
(Age: 21)

TazmanianD
TazmanianD

@cboy2332I'm a major fan of the original Thief games and definitely a fan of the original DE games. I'm also very much a pacifist/stealth type of player. To answer your question, DEHR is one of my favorite games. While it's not perfect, for what I like in a game, it was pretty close.


And that said, I am cautiously excited about this new Thief game. I like what they did with DEHR so I'm definitely giving them the benefit of the doubt. More of what I've heard about T4 is good than is bad.

boomhauer42
boomhauer42

@cboy2332 I enjoyed DEHR as a game but there were certain aspects that threw off the game. One thing is the imbalanced combat. The fact that the Heavy Rifle is significantly less effective than running around decking everyone in the face while devouring battery recharging candy bars is laughable. There was even a way to knock out the final boss with one punch. Another complaint was the boss fights. If you spent all your praxis kits on stealth rather than combat, then good luck trying to take down one of the merc bosses unless you've been carrying a rocket launcher just for the fight. The game forces you down the combat road instead of allowing freedom of approach like in the original. I still enjoyed HR and would recommend it however. 


With this Thief game I'm a little nervous. The first two are my favorite games ever created, and this new installment has some serious shoes to fill. Honestly, any little thing wrong will stir me into a fanboy frenzy where I lose all sense of logic and coherency, and I'm willing to admit that. 

Sozialminister
Sozialminister

@prats93 

yes. but ignorants rather give sqeenix more dollar instead of supporting independent modders who make better gameplay.

ziproy
ziproy

@electronic_eye That would imply this site puts journalistic integrity before manipulating titles that antagonize the commentors [People are Forbidden to talk about the Titanfall closed Beta!!!!].

ziproy
ziproy

@WraistlinGill I love games like this and Ass-Creed Black Flag. They tell us not to steal Thief or pirate Black Flag because stealing and piracy is a bad thing that you shouldn't do.

DigiRave
DigiRave

@WraistlinGill in store? Lol, real thieves would get it off the internet after a legit copy had been pirated, not in store.

quakke
quakke

@Zoglac

Are you kidding me?

It's not that i would just like to hate on modern games, no. It's that i have a very valid reason why i hate modern games. Every legend forexample, what are there? Tomb Raider, Splinter Cell, 007, Hitman, Duke Nukem and Thief, they get remakes that are completely different from the original. Yes i beleive variety is good, but these remakes don't bring variety and possibilities in to the games, they bring very stricked and Cinematic gameplay. These remakes often have way too high emphassis on "things need to be looking good when we show them", and just only showing things to me instead of just letting me play and discover em' on my own.

You know i absolutely hate it how every modern games stuffs cutscene after cutscene on my face. I just want to play. Seriously, play DOOM (1993) forexample and you will notice that the game will never interrupt you, never. Modern AAA games always interrupt you. Cinematics. They don't even add to the gameplay, so why do they have to have so big emphassis on them? Movies are different from games and everytime a game adds more the cinematic-side, they always come at the expense of fun and gameplay. Less fun and less gameplay. It should be more fun and more gameplay, and just only after that, start on builing some sort of story.

Seems like i seriously need to become a developer myself, because apparently i know all the things that makes a great game.

Carton_of_milk
Carton_of_milk

@Paoksis @Freboy  


Change is not bad. In any long running series at some point you have to make some. You have to attempt a certain evolution otherwise at some point you run the risk of becoming stale. And Eidos cannot count on just Thief fans to make their money on this game. Of course you could say they could trust that the reason the original games were popular is because the gameplay was good enough as it was, but games evolve. Some game concepts and mechanics grow old.. Personally i love stealth games but dspite the thief series being one of the forefather of the genre, i could never get into the two Thief games i tried (the second one, a handful of years after it came out and Deadly Shadows around its release). I'm not sure why exactly. I guess i felt the gameplay was limited and also, and that's just personal, i dont find stealing things that exciting. As a an end goal, for me it's rather weak.

Anyway, to get back to change in established franchises...

Personally i think ACIV is the best AC yet, the first to me that is close to actually being not just a very good game but a GREAT game (which is how i felt about the second one very good but not classic good, the first was a letdown, Brotherhood and Revelations were too much of the same, didn't try the third after what people said about it)  I like that it suddenly got a lot more open world, giving you a lot more freedom, i like the variety in gameplay they've put in the game, I like the economy aspect, buying and upgrading things. In fact i think there isnt enough customization options for your character and ship. This is the kinds of things i like in games. It's made the game deeper and less repetitive instead of being just about running on rooftops and killing people which frankly while originally a good gameplay mechanic, was getting pretty damn stale after 5 games (Ubisoft DOES pump out those AC games way too fast....). 

On the other hand, Hitman Absolution also tried to appeal to more people and fans like me hated it. Adding instinct, losing the open endedness, forcing you on un-Hitman like paths (you are stealthy for the whole mission, than a cutscene blows all your efforts...)  It lost the essence of what made Hitman great (which for me is killing just the target without ever using a gun...when its possible anywaw.... and getting a disguise only if absolutely necessary...loads of mission in all the games, except the first, allow that if you're patient and know what you're doing). The thing is, they lost fans with those changes, and i'm not really sure they gained any new fans either.....

So really, changes to franchises are bit of a crapshoot, but i think necessary. The main problem is not change, its that some devs are better than others at knowing what is good change and what is bad change. It all comes down to...do they really know what they're doing? Eidos Montreal in this here case doesnt seem like they do...the fact that they've gone back and made major changes to their original gameplay ideas...backpedalled so to speak, that does not bode well. I sense insecurity about their ideas...about whether the game is fun or not. you can never please everyone no but I fear they will end up pleasing no one in the end, 

Snepstok
Snepstok

@majorbuttache@Snepstok Yes, but it's there, so I'll use it. I get your point, but somehow it doesn't work like that for me, and I suspect many other gamers.
Let's say a game gives me a gun with 250 bullets
, I won't stop shooting after a 100 just because it's more realistic or difficult.

sigmact
sigmact

@dhindes @Sozialminister i played all the thief games before, didnt remember quite much they changed the stealth on it, maybe deadly shadows

cboy2332
cboy2332

@elbcen @cboy2332  No need to put your age fellow, because I'm older( but I'm not that kind of 'old fan' you know).

My point is, there is something that DEHR not as good as the first one, but there are other  things that make it better that the first one. And I'm not sure you should use prequel's', because the second one has no way compare with the other two.

cboy2332
cboy2332

@TazmanianD @cboy2332  Yeah~ We have the same opinion~ The only thing that bothers me is there will not be any boxed version for thief for PC. And there's still no news about the metal version.

quakke
quakke

@Sozialminister@prats93  

PC Gaming and Indie developers are the future of the game industry, because PC has the most possiblities from developers standpoint, PC has most mature users and the Indies are the only developers in this planet to INNOVATE anymore. AAA developers and publishers are only just stagnating game after game.


AAA publishers and developers are literally gonna stagnate themselves into grave. It's too late at this point, because they're not willing to take any risks due possibly not selling well. It's too late.

benelori
benelori

@quakke@Zoglac 

You would make a terrible developer IMO, if you can't see that the definition of fun can be different for people...

gameroutlawzz
gameroutlawzz

@quakke @Zoglac Sadly youre trying to argue with a bunch of cinephiles and casuals plaguing every gaming websites. This hobby like we always loved is truly doomed and turning into a bland cinematic POS that tries too hard at turning into fucking movies.  Your comment describes perfectly the sad state of this industry but it seems like none of  the braindeads visiting this website understands. Mostly because most people suck at what they do,which is playing video games. Theyd rather watch cut-scenes,follow a story and feel ''emotions'' out of fictional characters instead of pure fun and deep gameplay mechanics that keeps you on the edge of your seat and challenges your logic/brain and knowledge like the brilliance seen in most Nintendo games.  Out of all the trash that will be released in the future on PS/Xbox/PC Dark Souls 2 and Witcher 3 are the only interesting ones that seems to still put emphasis on gameplay and not the same,generic and tedious scripted and linear gameplay. Even most of the long-running well-established franchises like Duke Nukem,Resident Evil, Tomb Raider are becoming fucking movies with one of the most shallow gameplay Ive ever seen. Why the fuck does every games now play the same? Every 3rd person games are now hide-and-gun crap with scripted platforming,linear corridor-esque environment,barely any challenges or puzzles that require abit of thinking and a BIG big emphasis on a fucking story,dialogues and plot-holes (another reason why they tack in A.I partners).  The state of gaming nowadays truly make me sad. 

Im giving up on this POS hobby after Dark Souls 2/TW3 and whatever Nintendo puts out for the Wii U cause I truly have no time to waste on dull interactive movies that holds your hands and feel cliche as S***.

komuchen
komuchen

@quakke@Zoglacyou are complaining like there is no way to skip cinematics. And when Hitman and Duke got remake? Same with Splinter Cell?


You should not be developer, because in your post you go on like with the cinematics - nothing interesting. Cinematics = less fun? Wat? Well, fuck you, Wing Commander 3 would be nothing without it.
 But you are right, MGS sucks big time.

cboy2332
cboy2332

@quakke @komuchen Mirro edge has good story? Are you kidding me. If it has a good story it will be as great as portal, but sadly the story sucks. Everything except story from Mirror edge is perfect.

quakke
quakke

@komuchen

Skip the cinematics? Skip them to completely miss the "so pushed on face storytelling" and therefore not knowing what happened in the plot? Besides, most times cinematics are unskippable, so yeah.. try skipping em'.

Well, i didn't list it here because didn't feel like i need to (and i actually don't need to) but here are two games that many modern games could learn from. These two games have cinematics/cutscenes and they never interrupt anything nor do shove them down your throat every couple of minutes like a modern game does. The games i'm talking about are none other than The Chronicles of Riddick: Escape From Butcher Bay (2004) and EA's last good game, Mirror's Edge (2007). Best storytelling and amount of cutscenes ever in any FPS in those two games.


Well not all are maybe remakes but 2009 Splinter Cell: Conviction, Duke Nukem: Forever (2011), 007: Quantum of Solace (2007 and Blood Stone and those whole Goldeneye remakes that Activision released recently), Hitman: Absolution (2012), Splinter Cell: Blacklist (2013) are all sequels that completly derail from their original games. Tomb Raider (2013) is a remake though and completely about cinematic experience, not fun gameplay.


Metal Gear Solid 1-2 don't suck. If you say that, then you have no valid voice in this discussion.

Thief More Info

First Release on Feb 25, 2014
  • PC
  • Xbox One
  • + 3 more
  • PlayStation 4
  • PlayStation 3
  • Xbox 360
Thief is a reinvention of a classic franchise that has players take on the role of Garrett, THE master thief. When the city that created and defines him is threatened, Garrett must step from the shadows and uncover the truth before his world is torn apart forever.