How Half-Life Influenced BioShock Infinite

We speak with Irrational's creative director Ken Levine about the latest trailer revealed at the VGAs.

GameSpot: What's the significance of the song, "Will the Circle Be Unbroken" that you chose for Elizabeth to sing in the trailer?

Ken Levine: I talked to Courtnee who does the voice of Elizabeth in the game and I asked, "Hey Courtnee, do you sing?" She said, "Oh yeah--I kind of sing." It's interesting because she did all of the work in the movie Tangled, playing the part in the whole preproduction process, before they put Mandy Moore in. I heard her sing and thought we have to find a way to integrate this. So, what I really wanted to do first was a test of how it would feel or how it would feel if Elizabeth were singing. We were in the recording session and it turns out that Troy--who plays Booker--was there and he said, "Oh, by the way, I'm a musician. I play guitar." I thought maybe he could just play a few chords, but he ended up in the recording session for a few hours trying out different versions [of the song] and in different keys. He is this amazing musician and she has this incredible voice and I thought, "Wow. I lucked out here."

As for the integration in the game, there are a bunch of things I'm thinking about that I want to surprise people with. But we had an opportunity to do this trailer for Spike and we really just wanted to do a mood piece, and the mood we set out was this factory town of Finkton and the state people were living in before they become part of the Vox Populi. That song really stuck with me. I don't know if you know the song, but it's a period song...a hymn from the period, actually. It has a beautiful, haunting melody. It had the feeling of that town.

We were putting this trailer together, and I was trying to think what would bind it all together because if you do a trailer, you can just have it go to different lines of dialogue, but I didn't really want to do that. I wanted to do a mood piece. And we have this song, and it's like we have everything sitting here, so we just put it all together.

GS: When you're putting a trailer like this in front of this audience, are you trying to hook people who may not know every little bit about BioShock or are you catering to people who are already in the know?

KL: I think the goal was--and games are really behind the curve on this, taking cues from some of the better film trailers out there--can we create a mood? Also, game trailers are also [often about features like] here's a new weapon. There's plenty of room for that. We've done plenty of trailers like that. But given that this is an awards show, I really wanted to do something that was creating a mood and giving the sense of place. We talked internally about what themes we could feature to give a sense of what the mood is and then also have half the video be more action-oriented combat that plays against the song a little bit, but that's intentional. So I guess you don't really think about the audience so much as we think about what we're trying to convey.

GS: Do you get frustrated or does it bother you at all that you have to explain this stuff? Obviously, it's great for us to be able to talk to you about it, but do you ever just want to put something out there and have it speak for itself?

KL: There is part of me that loves talking about the game, of course. It's our baby. We love talking about our baby, but I think there are a lot of questions I get that are prior to the work being shown in any way. Like if I just said, "There's going to be music in the game," without knowing [anything about the trailer] or hearing Courtnee's voice or the tonality we wanted. I don't want to have to explain it ahead of time. I'd rather just show something. It's funny. Once people have already seen the content, I'm much more comfortable talking about it because the work has hopefully done a lot of the work for us. I get a lot of questions like, "What's Songbird's origin?" or "How does Elizabeth get her powers?" I don't want to talk about that because I'd much rather show it.

One of the most common things, and I'm going to level with you here, is someone will say to me, "Well, then you learn that Booker does that and Elizabeth this." Wait a minute. Don't tell me what I learned. Tell me what I see. When we show stuff publicly, I'd rather just put it in front of people then tell them about it. I'm far more frustrated that I'm asked about things before I have a chance to demonstrate them.

GS: You're introducing people to new areas in the BioShock Infinite world, like the Fink Manufacturing area. What do you want them to glean from the trailer?

KL: It's our responsibility to show an image and [make sure] that image has some resonance. When you look at that statue of Fink and you look at that giant clock, hopefully, people will take away some things about him, his world, and what's important to him without me having to explain it. I'd much rather open the curtain slowly, in the visual sense, on him. You see his town. You see the people and what their lives are like. You see what some of his ideals are through that opening shot of his statue and his clock. There's a lot of detail in there. If you look at that trailer, there are a lot of things that will tell you what's going on at a high level and give you a taste of this aspect of the world.

GS: With this trailer and the E3 demo, it seems like you're really trying to build up the relationship players have with Elizabeth before the game even comes out. Do you run into a potential issue of where the player's relationship with Elizabeth is going to supersede Booker's relationship with her?

KL: It's a fine line we walk with Elizabeth because Booker has a relationship with her and the player has a relationship with her. Then, Booker and the player have a relationship with her--this hybrid. When you're doing a first-person game, you have to be very careful that you don't step on the player's intention, and that's a fine line to walk and we're very conscious of it. I can't tell you, "Oh my god! We're going to make this absolutely perfect! We know exactly how to do it!" It's a real experiment...how we do that or how we foster the connection between Booker and the player, Elizabeth and the player, and how we merge those two together.

For us, the notion of having these characters [being the focus of] an FPS isn't something you think about all that often. The best example is Alyx from Half-Life 2 because she's central to that story and she's an emotional driver in that story. I think what we're trying to do is take that notion and make a character who's even more central and has a relationship with a character who has a voice, unlike Gordon Freeman. And I think that we're making her more central to gameplay and making her more central to giving the player a voice in what he does in the game in terms of the tears. It's just giving her a real story arc to go through. This person starts completely naive, having never seen anything or done anything, but is thrown into this horrible world and forced to grow up very fast. How does it change her?

Games are stories about change. She changes. Booker changes; and they change each other. She is really central, so we want to feature her a lot. But from a technology standpoint and a narrative standpoint, we're doing things that people really haven't done. We have this notion here that when you look at Liz and she sort of looks like a robot, staring at you creepily, we lose. We spent a ton of time and resources just figuring out what she does moment to moment. We have an actual actor. Well, an actor can make choices moment to moment. They can create content moment to moment because they're a person, right?

With Elizabeth, we have to construct all of the underlying technology that generates what she does moment to moment; where she looks, how she crosses her arms. Like that shot we have where she looks at the camera--that's a shot that's actually generated. That's not an animation. That's a bunch of heuristics put together where she will occasionally look at the player. Depending on what else she's interested in the world, she might lose interest in something and then turn and look at the player. That's just a great shot we caught of her looking at Booker in the simulation.

She's obviously really important to us and what we're doing.

GS: When I watch this trailer I find myself asking a question of who I'm supposed to sympathize with--Elizabeth, a crumbling Columbia, the people who are sick or poor. Is Infinite the kind of game where there is no clear-cut morality? It seems like everyone has a justification for doing what they're doing in the game.

KL: People ask me often, "Is this the hero?" or "Is this the villain?" Once you get that to that question, you've kind of lost. It's very hard in life to find...well, let me just put it this way, one person's terrorist is another person's freedom fighter. That's not to whitewash any horrible things people have done, but I think it's much more interesting to send a question to the audience and ask, "What do you think?" instead of predetermining everything.

What's interesting is what you saw in the trailer is a world where workers and the underclass in Columbia live in. You saw in the last demo what the Vox Populi become and they become pretty dark figures themselves, and you actually see that progression in the game. Booker and Elizabeth are at the center of that progression--whether it's intentionally or unintentionally. Like what we did with the original BioShock, we show how these things can happen or how these movements become a certain way. I won't tell you exactly how that happens, but watching its evolution in front of your eyes is going to be a very interesting thing.

You don't just sort of come upon [the Vox Populi] as you see them in the last demo where they're ethnically cleansing a part of town; you see where that rage comes from. That doesn't necessarily mean you're going to watch what they're doing later on and say, "Oh yeah, I totally support that." In terms of what they do later on, you're going to say, "Holy s***! What have they become?"

GS: Obviously, this is a BioShock game and there seem to be certain tenets that you're sticking to because it has that name. Along those lines, do your business sense and creative sense ever collide?

KL: Not really. We've been making Shock games for a while now--System Shock, BioShock, BioShock Infinite. They're very similar in a lot of ways, but they're also quite different from one another. We know we started this movement of let's combine shooting, character growth, deep environmental storytelling, and a superpower beyond shooting. That's what these games all really have in common, whether or not there are any connections beyond thematic connections, which I haven't really talked much about. It felt very much like a BioShock game. It always was a BioShock game.

To me, and for us as a studio, doing another BioShock game set in Rapture wouldn't be a BioShock game because it doesn't have that component of learning about a new place. That first hour of the original BioShock, you're coming to this place and you're like, "What the f***! What is this place?" To not have that feeling for me, and for us as a studio, makes it not a BioShock game.

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Discussion

94 comments
Yulaw2000
Yulaw2000

@Sonny009 Yeah, BS2 is a bit pants.

Sonny009
Sonny009

@Yulaw2000 yes, thats why it doesnt count/wasnt good.

Meteora1991
Meteora1991

such an annoying voice, they should have put music instead

y3ivan
y3ivan

Seriously HL3? after playing HL2, i was like -__- i didnt even continue with episode 1 eventhough it was included in the disc.

kyleweeeeeeeeee
kyleweeeeeeeeee

The best part about this generation of gaming is how clear the line is between developers who have a passion for their games; producing pure quality entertainment, and those who seek money; only producing what they know will sell. Thank you for being the innovators. You are the few who keep me playing.

CallMeDuraSouka
CallMeDuraSouka

Very interesting take on the song, the phrasing of the guitar sounded "reached for" tho, funny how every one who does acting of a sort thinks they are muscians. But I'm still very much imppreessed with what they shown so far, hoorrya for people that think outside the box.

theblandyman
theblandyman

@Itchyflop Too bad the WiiU is its own console, not merely an add-on. You should know what you're talking about if you're gonna bother talking about it.

spearhead91
spearhead91

I'm sorry but this interview absolutely sucks, nowhere did they ask how they are drawing from the political and economic turmoil in the US and how it is inspiring the entire premise of the game, even when it is glaringly obvious that it is. Instead you ask them questions that even an 8 year old could : how are you doing immersion? what is the significance of the song you attached to the advertisement for an awards show? Who pays you hacks?

JJB03
JJB03

@rasputin177 sorta but i didnt mind as this guy does know his stuff I want to play this game and i think he knows there are people who really want to play it already so i don't blame him for having some added confidence

Yulaw2000
Yulaw2000

@Morphine_OD Unfortunately EA are sitting on the System Shock brand, and as long as they own it, I doubt any good games can be made with that name.

Yulaw2000
Yulaw2000

@Sonny009 If I'm not mistaken, ken didn't have much to do with BS2.

Sonny009
Sonny009

love ken levine. also lol, last sentence basically means "bioshock 2 is not a bioshock game." GOOD MAN!

Morphine_OD
Morphine_OD

I'd like them to do something more contemporary like a new System shock.

rasputin177
rasputin177

ehhhh maybe not so much the second time

rasputin177
rasputin177

I thought he had some interesting things to say and it looks cool but am I the only one who thought he came off a little cocky?

Sgthombre
Sgthombre

Kinda of a lame trailer in my opinion. It shows nothing that hasn't been shown before, and the song felt completely out of place. Hell, it would even be out of place in a trailer for the first game, which takes place 30 years after this Infinite!

Trickymaster
Trickymaster

Half Life 3? I think if they are working on it, it will probably be next gen and not run on High-end PCs for another 2 years.

Atheno
Atheno

I'm not sure when HL3 is going to be out, but what I do know, and I'm almost 100% sure of this, is that Bioshock Infinite is going to be mind blowing....and so will HL3. Bring on these two gems!!!

3116porter
3116porter

i hope that this won't be the kind of music in this game though i loved bioshock 1 and 2s sound track the erie ragtag music fit the dull dark and interesting environment of rapture perfectly so i hope this will be the same

3116porter
3116porter

looks like the best one yet!!!!!!!

CrossFire312
CrossFire312

@fang_proxy "Half Life 3: Combine Dance Party" That wouldn't be awesome. At all. Valve can still screw up Half Life... Just sayin.

CrossFire312
CrossFire312

@killered3 I liked Bioshock 2. Definitely not as much as 1, but I wouldn't call it a bust. It was just different than 1.

Darnasian
Darnasian

@Supabul Keep dreaming... Nintendo never excelled in graphics and I think they never will... It's not their style... And to be honest... Bioshock is not a franchise for Wii U... It doesn't suit it...

sagejonathan
sagejonathan

"One person's terrorist is another person's freedom fighter." Very interesting quote. Anyways, can't wait for the game.

killered3
killered3

Hope this doesn't become a bust like Bioshock 2.

MrBBQ56
MrBBQ56

@syler4815162342 It is more than a game.

archvile_78
archvile_78

Great interview, i can't wait for this game.

y3ivan
y3ivan

love bioshock and they are willing to break boundaries :3

Fartman7998
Fartman7998

@FkThisName -- I guess they are trying to let Half-Life keep it's honor, instead of moving too fast. Who knows... It's good to see that they are putting so much thought into these games. I wonder, is Levine saying that Elizabeth is random, like the NPCs and Dragons in Skyrim?

fang_proxy
fang_proxy

bioshock has original concept like half life,but you can't compare them,as for the half life,whatever it will be it will awesome in every aspect,we trust you valve!just give us a teaser already

FkThisName
FkThisName

Bioshock keeps pushing the boundaries while Half-life falls further behind. Tool comes out with albums faster than new Half-life games, and that isn't saying much.

arruu2000
arruu2000

everybody talking bout HL3... well, me too! I would like Valve to release HL: Episode 3 before a new g-engine. I just don´t like cutting the Episodes for such a long period of time. Then, they could release a HL 3 with new gen graphics, no problem.

praack
praack

nice read, and the parallel to Half Life 2 is very interesting, this will be a great game with polished game play so early on. the dev here shares a lot in common with the bioshock and the HL games. well thought out, well planned and released when ready HL3 will come (valve time), they are under more pressure this time to create it- they got DOTA out of the way- but I think DOTA and the latest CS was the last gasp for SOURCE. my guess is they'll build a new engine then release HL3

itchyflop
itchyflop

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

Supabul
Supabul

Nobody like the Wii U around here, again I hope theres a Wii U version thats exactly the same as the 360, PS3 version with no graphical upgrade or better framerate

toddx77
toddx77

So valve people are still talking about half life so give us half life 3, screw next gen! lol

winshot
winshot

Bioshock is life in a mirror!!!

s4dn3s5
s4dn3s5

HL3 isn't coming before next gen, so quit talkin' BS, there is no hype. BS3 looks great, I'm sure Levine will give us a game as great as BS1.

Soothsayer42
Soothsayer42

I love Bioshock surrounding details :D steam punk style! It always cheers me up :)

ricklames
ricklames

i wont get the game because bioshock sucks!! but look at those t!ts!!!!!!! ba stards will sell this to you h0rny idiots ,lol

the_requiem
the_requiem

@valdarez: Going by actual history of this [and many other], how religious you have to be to put Lord in this song? Who knows, maybe there was a time when song did have Lord before it was taken out and then put back in, maybe if you go really back in time. The point being, these things change and morph all the time. Here's a shocker, Jesus wasn't born on 25th December and 300 years ago there was no Santa Claus.

DaN_WiL
DaN_WiL

@Kooken58 Yes we all know that but the late 90's are over now. If you want I can tell you what happened to Ross and Rachael to help you make that big leap into August 2004 that way you don't get overwhelmed with all of the new stuff Larry Page is about to give us

DaN_WiL
DaN_WiL

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

Kooken58
Kooken58

@Supabul there is a better version running at 40, 60, 100 fps...however much your machine can handle...and its called PC

Pyxidium
Pyxidium

I absolutely love where Ken Levine is taking the series. However, I just can't let go of Rapture, it's just too close to my heart. I feel like there should be at least one more BioShock game set in Rapture. A game set during the fall of Rapture would be very, very interesting. It could follow someone who just arrived in Rapture and the player could physically watch the deterioration of Rapture for the first time. It'd be so sick.

TrueProphecy22
TrueProphecy22

Half-Life 3, where are you? On the topic of the article, Bioshock 3 is going to be amazing.