Greatest Gaming Rig Part Three - Boot Test

We fit a cooler, plug in some SATA cables, and wire up a power supply as our epic rig springs to life.

With all of our gear ready to go, and the processors and RAM already slotted in place, we decided it was time to boot up our epic rig. Before we could fire it up, though, we needed to attach some cooling, a power supply, and some storage. Sadly, this process wasn't as straightforward as we initially hoped, with confusing error messages and parts that didn't want to fit together causing problems.

For any boot test, it's wise to start off with as few parts as possible. This minimises the risk of failure and allows for an easier diagnosis of the problem, should something go wrong. To that end we went for the simplest possible configuration: one processor, 12GB of RAM, one graphics card, a storage drive, and a power supply. With the processor and RAM already in place, our first task was to fit a cooler to the CPU. While this is usually a relatively simple task, the server-based nature of the SR-2 motherboard made things a little more complex.

The troublesome Xeon backplate.

With the standard LG 1366 backplate fitted, we can easily fit the H70.

Intel's Xeon processors mount into a standard LGA 1366 socket. While this should make them compatible with a range of coolers, the SR-2 actually comes fitted with a specialist Xeon backplate, designed specifically for server cooling setups. This means standard consumer coolers like the Corsair H70 won't fit. Fortunately the SR-2 also comes with a set of standard LGA 1366 backplates, which allow for consumer setups. However, removing the existing ones was not an easy task, requiring a torx screwdriver, some skillful motherboard balancing, and a delicate touch around the processor slot. Once the smaller plates were fitted, mounting the plastic backplate for the H70 was as easy as pushing it through the holes on the rear of the board and screwing in the retention ring on the other side. We then slotted the pump into the retention ring and tightened the four screws, and hey, presto, instant water-cooling.

The mounting ring for the H70 in place.

The H70 fully fitted.

Next we mounted a GTX 460 in a PCI express slot and plugged in a solid-state drive and an optical drive into the SATA ports on the motherboard. The final step was to wire up the power supply. The SR-2 requires more power than the average board, especially when overclocking. As standard, it needs one 24-pin ATX connection and a further two 8-pin ATX connections. For overclocking, the board has slots for two additional 6-pin PCIe connectors as well as another situated next to the expansion slots, which is required when using multiple GPUs. When we totaled up the connections, we realised that the Corsair AX1200 we were using simply didn't have enough connectors to power everything. Including the four graphics cards, we would need an astonishing 12 PCIe connectors to keep everything powered when overclocking. To get around this we decided to use an additional power supply for the full build, Corsair's AX850. This way we'd be able to power the board and storage with the AX850, while the AX1200 powered the four graphics cards.

Our fully assembled test rig.

With everything wired up and all fingers crossed, we hit the power button and hoped for the best. We were greeted with a barrage of flashing lights, spinning fans, and numerous indecipherable beeping noises. We waited for the boot menu to appear on the monitor, only to be filled with crushing disappointment as the motherboard's debug LED flashed 2E and failed to boot. After a quick flick through the manual we discovered 2E stood for "Initialise output devices." Not hugely helpful, but enough to tell us that the problem likely lay with the graphics card. After a lot of fiddling and puzzling, we realised our rookie mistake: only one PCIe connector was plugged into the GPU, meaning it didn't have enough power to initialise. One huge facepalm later we fired up the rig again and all was well. We hit the boot screen and entered the BIOS, where we could see that the RAM and the processor were both recognised and working fine.

Now that we've got the rig up and running, it's time to plug in the rest of our gear and install an OS. Check back next week, because we'll be running some initial benchmarking at stock speeds to see what this thing can really do. Don't forget that we're giving you the chance to win the entire rig*, complete with accessories! Just head over here to find out more.

* To enter you have to be over 13 and a UK resident; the competition is subject to our normal terms and conditions.

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Discussion

11 comments
bwaxtor
bwaxtor

all that to output via VGA ;(

qazmaz
qazmaz

haha Uk only if i win im gonna eat crumpets as a celebration!

Rovelius
Rovelius

Can't wait to see some benchmarks.

Flat_Line_____
Flat_Line_____

Maaaaan..... I was SO distracted by the sight of Giveaway that I almost went ahead with trying to lookup all these components, adding it all together, and then converting it into punds. Lol, good thing I caught the disclaimer.... Although it's not really GOOD since I can't enter.... ;( Well, then again...probably IS a good thing in the end anyway, I would have probably died from a heart attack if I actually won that thing. Who am I kidding, GOD, I would be like a 5yr old kid on Christmas with that thing in my hands.

JamilAhmed1994
JamilAhmed1994

Wow, I made the same rookie mistake when installing my new graphics card.

anotherone10
anotherone10

Build is looking great :D. I was just wondering, will the added Corsair AX850 PSU affect people who have already entered?

mlord5000
mlord5000

Overkill is such a wonderful thing

markB0SS
markB0SS

BY THE POWER OF GREYSKULL!

Falmar
Falmar

LOL at rookie mistake... Yesterday I had the same after replacing my graphx card :B