GameSpot's Guide to 3D Gaming

We take a look at how 3D gaming works and which platforms support it.

by

With the release of James Cameron's Oscar-winning Avatar in 2009, 3D got a major shot in the arm. Though 3D technology has been used in cinemas since the 1950s, it has largely been relegated to B-movie horror flicks or, more recently, special screenings at the IMAX. Even gaming has previously flirted with 3D, with Sega's shutter glasses-powered SegaScope system on the 8-bit Master System and Nintendo's red-screened Virtual Boy.

Avatar kick-started the 3D revolution and netted over $2 billion at the box office.

Now, post-Avatar, a strings of films, including Alice in Wonderland, Toy Story 3, and How to Train Your Dragon have all been released in 3D, with many more due to roll out of Hollywood later this year. Video games are also embracing 3D in a big way; Sony's PlayStation 3 now has the ability to play 3D games, with titles such as Wipeout HD, Killzone 3, and Little Big Planet 2 all featuring support for 3D. Nintendo unveiled its 3DS to a stunned Electronic Entertainment Expo audience this year, promising to give gamers glasses-free 3D on the go. And, of course, there is the humble PC, which is able to play most games in 3D with Nvidia's 3D Vision kit.

So, just how can you get yourself set up for 3D in the home? This guide will tell you everything you need to know about 3D; how it works, what equipment you need, what games are available, and how well it works.

The Science

There are three main types of 3D technology currently in use across TV, cinema, and gaming: polarised, LCD shutter, and parallax barrier. To understand how each technology works, first, we have to look at how exactly our brains generate a 3D image. Our ability to see in three dimensions is based on the fact that we have two eyes, placed next to each other, which is known as binocular vision. This allows us to not only see the length, width, and height of an object, but it also lets us perceive the depth and distance of it.

Polarised glasses are a common sight at cinemas.

Because each of our eyes is in a slightly different position, each eye has a different perspective on whatever it perceives. If you close one eye at a time, you can look at the individual images that your eyes see and notice how objects appear differently in both. This difference is known as vertical shift. The closer an object is, the bigger the vertical shift. What our brain does is analyse the two images, and via a process known as stereopsis, combines them to form a single picture. The difference in shift between the images allows us to judge the depth and distance of an object.

The various 3D technologies fool the brain into giving an object depth by sending two slightly different images to each eye, replicating the vertical shift that happens in the real world. Films and TV shows use cameras with two lenses to capture those images, while 3D animated films and games can simply move the virtual camera perspective to render them. What differs between each of the different 3D technologies is how the two images are sent to your eyes.

The Tech

The most common form of 3D is polarization. It’s often used in cinemas or at events where many people are watching at once. It works by filtering light into one of two circular polarization states, known as left-handed and right-handed. The light can then pass through a polarizing filter with the same state, but it will be blocked by one with an opposing state. This means that by wearing glasses with a corresponding filter on each lens, a different video signal can be sent to each eye from a pair of projectors. Polarization is ideal for cinemas, as the glasses are cheap and easy to produce, but there is some loss of light through the filters and lenses resulting in a dimmer picture.

An early version of LCD shutter glasses used in Sega’s SegaScope 3D system.

While polarization is taking on 3D duties on the silver screen, home users are most likely to be viewing their 3D media with LCD shutter glasses. They work by taking advantage of the high refresh rates (120Hz or above) that current display technologies are capable of, such as plasma and LCD. This high frame rate allows the TV to send out two separate high-definition pictures at 60Hz each, alternating between each frame sequentially. The glasses are linked up to the TV wirelessly, and in synchronization with the refresh rate of the screen, they open and close their lenses in rapid succession. This means each eye only sees the frame it’s supposed to, creating a 3D image. The technology has many advantages, including reduced ghosting, zero reduction of the colour spectrum, and improved viewing angles. Shutter glasses have actually been used in gaming for some time, with Sega's SegaScope 3D system making its debut on the 8-bit Master System back in the '80s.

The third technology soon to be making its mass-market debut in Nintendo's 3DS is known as autostereoscopic parallax barrier, which allows you to view 3D without the need for glasses. It works by adding a special filter to an LCD screen, which enables it to direct light to each eye individually via a series of precision slits. Your brain then pieces the two images together and, presto, glasses-free 3D. However, there are some issues with the technology, the biggest of which is the limited viewing angle. Unless you’re looking at the screen from a certain sweet spot, the 3D effect simply doesn’t work. The screen also requires double the number of horizontal pixels it would normally use, which in the case of the 3DS means its 800x240 pixel display actually only delivers 400 pixels of resolution in practice.

PlayStation 3

Sony flipped the switch on its 3.30 firmware for the PlayStation 3 back in April, which gave the console the ability to play 3D games. To take advantage of 3D, you need a compatible TV. At the moment, they are more expensive than their 2D counterparts and not all come supplied with LCD shutter glasses, which cost about £100. If you’re running your video through an A/V switch or amplifier, you also need to make sure it's HDMI 1.4 compatible; otherwise, it won’t work.

Soon you’ll be able to witness the strangling firsthand with Killzone 3 in 3D.

Currently, there are four 3D titles available to download from the PlayStation Store, which come bundled in a pack priced at £23.99: Wipeout HD, Super Stardust HD, PAIN, and a single level demo of Motorstorm: Pacific Rift. Each has differing levels of 3D effects, with varying amounts of depth of field and objects flying out of the screen. Wipeout HD is the most impressive of the bunch, with its bright neon art style and long draw distances lending themselves well to 3D. The majority of the effect is kept to increasing the perceived depth, allowing you to see the racetrack stretching off into the distance. This not only lets you more accurately anticipate upcoming corners, but also adds to the feeling of speed as you race along the tracks. A similar effect is applied to Motorstorm: Pacific Rift, albeit with much more debris flying into your face. Super Stardust HD works slightly differently. This time, 3D is used to create clearly defined layers, with the planet on the bottom, the ship in the middle, and debris from asteroids on top.

Many upcoming games will also have 3D support, including shooter Killzone 3, Gran Turismo 5, and upcoming Move title The Fight. Third parties are also getting in on the action, with Ubisoft’s Shaun White Skateboarding being one of the first to take advantage of 3D, complete with increased depth and a visually enhanced flow system. A further update to the PlayStation 3 will also allow it to play 3D Blu-ray movies and is due later this year.

PC

Nvidia unveiled its 3D Vision technology back at the 2009 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. It remains the only option for viewing 3D content on a PC, as well as one of the cheapest ways to play games in 3D, depending on what hardware you currently run. To get started, you need at least a Core 2 Duo or Athlon X2 processor and a GeForce 8 Series or higher video card; you'll also need to be running Windows Vista or 7. You need a 3D vision compatible projector or display as well, such as the Acer Aspire GD245HQ, which has the required 120Hz refresh rate. Finally, you need one of Nvidia's £120 ($190) 3D vision kits, which contain active shutter glasses and a USB transmitter to sync them.

Nvidia's 3D shutter glasses and USB transmitter.

Setting up the kit is as simple as installing the drivers and plugging in the transmitter. Unlike the PlayStation 3, many existing games work in 3D without being specifically designed for it. A full list of these can be found over on Nvidia's Web site. We tried out the system with a number of games, including Portal and Starcraft II. Portal’s compatibility is rated as “excellent,” and we found it worked extremely well. The added depth made solving the spatial puzzles more enjoyable and the whole game much more immersive. Starcraft II works similarly well, with added depth to the playing field and explosions flying from the screen. Games such as Batman: Arkham Asylum and Just Cause 2 benefit from being designed specifically for 3D Vision. There isn’t a huge amount of difference between them and titles not designed for the system, though you may notice the 3D effect being less prominent in the latter.

3DS

Unveiled at this year’s Electronic Entertainment Expo, the 3DS has won the hearts of the gaming press, winning the Best of Show award from a collection of the industry’s top critics. Unlike all other forms of 3D, you don’t need special glasses to play; all you need is the device itself. Physically, it looks much like its predecessors the DS Lite and DSi, with the same clamshell design. However, there are numerous improvements inside, including the wider top screen, increased resolution for both screens, dual cameras for taking 3D photos, an analog stick, and a beefier graphics system to push all the extra pixels. There’s also a 3D slider, allowing you to adjust the level of the 3D effect in games.

Nintendo’s 3DS was the talk of the show at E3. Sadly, it looks like you’ll be waiting until 2011 to get your hands on one.

Nintendo announced a slew of games at E3; many will bring some of the most loved video game characters of all time to life in 3D. First-party games include Animal Crossing, Kid Icarus: Uprising, Mario Kart, Nintendogs + Cats, Paper Mario, Pilotwings Resort, Star Fox 64 3D, and Steel Diver. There was also a massive amount of third-party support on show from all the major publishers, including games such as DJ Hero 3D, Resident Evil: Revelations, Super Street Fighter IV 3D, FIFA, Metal Gear Solid Snake Eater 3D, Professor Layton and the Mask of Miracle, Assassin's Creed: Lost Legacy, Dead or Alive, and a Final Fantasy 3DS project.

Of course, the question on everyone’s lips is: Does it work? Amazingly, it does work. Though it takes a few seconds for your eyes to adjust, the 3D effect is very convincing. Objects pop off the screen, and there is an increased sense of depth, with multiple layers visible. The effect is used differently across the available games, with some working better than others. In Nintendogs, for example, your virtual pet’s paws and nose seem to pop right out of the screen, with toys such as the Frisbee and ball sitting above the background. However, in Kid Icarus: Uprising, the effect adds depth to the playing field, allowing you to see into the screen and judge the distance of objects at which to shoot. The 3D slider can be used to adjust the effect, so it can be tuned to your own vision or turned off altogether.

Despite the influx of 3D gaming devices and the huge success of films, such as Avatar, there are still concerns that the technology will ultimately flop, much like it has in the past. Cost is still a prohibitive factor, particularly for Sony’s PlayStation 3 setup, which requires a specific TV. However, Sony itself believes that games may be the “killer content” for 3D, pushing consumers to pick up new sets.

Unlike the Virtual Boy, 3D looks set to stay this time around.

While cost may be an issue for some, others may be discouraged by medical issues. Around 6 million Britons suffer from poor binocular vision according to UK charity The Eyecare Trust, making it difficult for them to see 3D effects. Eye experts in the US are recommending viewers get their eyes checked before watching 3D, as even minor eye problems can cause headaches over prolonged sessions. In fact, both Sony and Nintendo have issued guidelines recommending viewers take regular breaks while viewing a 3D display and to supervise children under 6 years of age. Sony also warns of potential side effects, including eye strain, eye fatigue, and nausea.

At the cinema, there are already signs that the 3D bubble may be about to burst. Recent statistics have shown that box office takings for 3D movies have steadily decreased over the past few months, with more opting to see the film in 2D, with its cheaper ticket price. However, unlike the many failed attempts at pushing 3D to the home and cinema in the past, the huge improvements in technology are undeniable, creating a much more compelling viewer experience. And with the film industry, TV manufacturers, Nintendo, Sony, and Nvidia banking on its success, there may be enough weight behind 3D to convince us all it's worth splashing out on.

Discussion

158 comments
zidan4000
zidan4000

very good article and very informative indeed , it actually made me care about 3D when they described the experience with WipeOut HD and Motorstorm and how it added to the depth in the game.

FatmanComplex
FatmanComplex

"IceQBkid Posted Oct 1, 2010 1:06 pm GMT Has anyone bothered to read the last page? 3D tech is bad for ur eyes...I wish it wasnt i really do but unless we evolve into some higher beings i do think 3D will flop over time" You've GOT to be kidding. They said the same crap about CRT TVs, and LCD monitors, and even crazy nonsense about safety glass being used for windshields. Our eyes naturally process 3D. Please, get over it. With current technology, if you sit, staring into a screen for hours on end, your eyes get strained, and can lead to injury. Thats why there are advisories to take breaks even with 2D games. Wow, swallow another pill and read another script. Better yet, don't post anymore.

revanknight
revanknight

I have one of those Sony 3-D tv's. Haven't hooked up my PS3 yet, but I'm curious to see how it would all look in 3-D.

lenmo
lenmo

Nope bought 55 inch Samsung 3D LED with wireless 3d blueray player 2 pairs of glasses and a 3d movies for $2600 same amount I bought my piece of crap Mitsubishi 61 DLP for 5 years ago. It is affordable and it looks incredible. Tons of movies just came out for xmas for 3d and my tv up converts the xbox to 3d even without wearing glasses. The depth added to games makes the image in HD so much more sweet. But true I dont play normally on 3d because the refresh rate for the tv is too slow and causes some games to be sluggish (controller and movement on screen are almost delayed/laggy) thats why the manufacturer added a game mode that you can switch between. Anyway this is the best picture of any tv I've owned regardless if it is 3d or not. The movies in 3d are so much better than the IMAX movies that you spend $20 a ticket to go see. Sorry I'm not convinced that it is a gimmick or will be declared worthless. Its just another step to somewhere else better like VHS/Beta or Cassettes were back in the day. Spend your time waiting for the next best thing I dont care but dont speak unless you know what your talking about.

CityBanditi
CityBanditi

how much money I need for basic 3d stuff?

KrazzyDJ
KrazzyDJ

Although I'm optimistic of the fact that I'm not gonna lay my hands on 3D for a really long time, this article was quite informative. Bookmarked !!!

unknowncake
unknowncake

im just gonna wait till 3D gets cheaper because its a rippoff right now

Kid_Black_Star
Kid_Black_Star

Still wondering how cool it will be playing COD on one of these things XD. But i think i will pass until it it gets cheaper

Mohammad37
Mohammad37

anyway to play 3d on my normal hdtv samsung ? like 3d monitor or something ? please help

kpolicoff
kpolicoff

I'm VERY happy with my Nvidia 3D vision glasses and my Asus monitor. I have tons of games that look fantastic... games that most people already play. WoW is fun in 3d... but some games are really quite stunning. It's hard for me to go down the path of the 3DTV and PS3 when there's simply no content. I have a library of thousands upon thousands of games that work in 3d... some old... some new. I'd say that I'd be more interested in getting a TV that works with Nvidia's 3dtv software solution and 3d vision... or perhaps I'll simply invest in a 3d projector. They're not out yet in 1080p... but some are really quite cheap.

AoiKita
AoiKita

I just want it for team Ico's titles.... and maybe nature programs! imagine a tiger running towards you! as in, not graphics or cg like in movies, but the real animal recorded, living and breathing on your tv screen---or what about a snake striking at you, or watching the eagle fly as if you could touch it.

geocool
geocool

Very nice article. It has everything you need to know to get into the new 3D world. 3D is still expensive and i think 3DS will be the cheapest way to "feel" it.

monoxide582
monoxide582

i have a master system, 3d glasses, about 50+ games, cartridge and little sliver cards, the gun, joystick, rollerball controller, and the standard 2 button rectangles. heavenly :D the 3d is awesome for being from 87

biokrysty
biokrysty

we should wait a little longer for 3d tto be perfect and cheap

hp-90
hp-90

You shouldn'nt upgrade you'r TV to 3D yet, because the 3D TV's causes some side effects.

KaptinKod
KaptinKod

None of the Hype surrounding it makes me want to upgarde my TV (yet). Show me something amazing with 3D, then i'll buy into it.

javagaul
javagaul

will ati follow the nvidia's way in 3d gaming?

bandit7319
bandit7319

I got a 3D TV yesterday and I'm lovin it. However, I would suggest people wait on it. I've got Wipeout in 3D and it looks awesome. The TV I got came with a 3D IMAX sampler and I bought My Bloody Valentine 3D, and they all look awesome. I got to work today looking for more 3D stuff, and I knew the content was limited but I didn't realize HOW limited. And WipeOut like I said looks great, but I've gotta wait a few more months before any big time 3D games come out aside from little downloadable games. I also don't think 3D will make HDTVs obsolete by any means. It might eventually make it's way into being a standard feature, but I definitely don't think EVERYTHING will be in 3D until auto-stereoscopic. I would've kept on waiting, but it was a great TV at the price I was waiting for with the bundles I wanted, so I dived into it. Probably shouldn't have lol

voice83
voice83

to all the haters, you can't fight progress. you may be a little upset right now because the technology is still expensive, but it's not going anywhere. first adopters will be gamers, then huge sports fans, then maybe eccentric movie buffs, then little by little it will seep into every household and tv channels will soon all support 3D, much like the HD revolution

Lewk-07
Lewk-07

I don't know, I like the slightly layered 3D it looks cool. I've heard people say they didn't like Avatar 3D because it didn't look very 3D but thats why I liked it. I enjoy the subtle 3D, not the WHOAAAAAAA in your face 3D.

jm3811
jm3811

HD is a massive improvement but 3D is a total gadget. That's not gonna enhance the quality of the games anyway I would expect team ICO to do a great job with such technology, but I tried Pacific Rift the other day and it was pointless

penpusher
penpusher

they fail to point out that if one of your eyes doesnt work (if like me you have lazy eye for example) that you neednt bother getting excited ... we cant see it

DamageIncM
DamageIncM

I find media turning 3D a quite natural thing too. And I felt similar about widescreen finally becoming a standard for displays at home. Because our vision isn't square, and it's not 2D either. I would still agree though that almost all classic films and such should still be viewed in 2D. But if you can make new ones in 3D, it's great, it would only add to the experience. Especially with games being played in real-time. After all, they are already made in virtual 3D, only it doesn't come out of the screen. It's about time that we can almost really "be there". Otherwise, even though it does add a dimension to games, they wouldn't have started making games in 3D. (And I'm still talking about the 3D-visuals in general, without the glasses and such.) It was already made to make things seem deeper and more real. Also, I don't think it's unhealthy at all. If anything it keeps your eyes "trained", when you focus on different depths in the image. Personally, my eyes have become lazy, at least one of them, from working behind 2D-screens too much over the last decade or so. And I used to have a very sharp vision. Once I started using 3D-technology, I couldn't focus well with films at first. Later on though, I found it "trained" my eyes to work better at different depths in the image. But that's just my experience. If anything else, the rule of taking a break every hour or so still applies. But that's not only for your eyes...

cyclonebw
cyclonebw

Explain how you can view 3D with shutter glasses without a 3D player? Black Ops for 360 in 3D makes no sense? Is it just the polarized technology or does the 360 actually use BlueRay and we were all fooled?

nikola96
nikola96

@badman11226 you are completly right

joelwyncott
joelwyncott

Hoorah for 3DS! I want one so bad! The DS will always be the best handheld gaming system. I sold my DS Lite and got PSP 2001, and I'm sorely regretting it.

badman11226
badman11226

Sweet i cant wait for 3D contact lenses /sarcasm. I dont know watz worse , the overhype of 3D, grown a$$ people using Twitter, Justin Beiber(dont care if i spell his name wrong). We are a nation full of gullible idiots.

kmconstable
kmconstable

3D is still being utilized with newer tech, but with the same general ideas as were used in the 50's. Even the approach Nvidia is using. The best chance for 3D to truly be useful is for the screen being used to play the games or media to support 3D natively. That way people can program for a screen and the technology in the screen and not specifically for Nvidia, AMD or Intel graphics processors. The soon to be released 3DS is a good example of this kind of tech. People will use 3D when they no longer have to use glasses and suffer with sub-par color and brightness from the technology. This is why imo Nvidia's approach is strictly a short-term model. There will be a significant difference between games built for native 3D screens versus a software overlay to add it after the fact and a slightly more refined approach from the 1950s. That is why Avatar was so successful as a 3D movie because it was built for 3D from the beginning and not just tacked on.

anthonycg
anthonycg

Just like blu-ray until it is easier for people to get their hands on it will struggle. Even more so now that only gamers will consider buying this.

zopdog
zopdog

Yah i have nvidia 3d kit and 120hz monitor the only games that play good in 3d and dont give you a headake .Are world of warcraft and gothic 3.. Battlefeild bad company 2 looks good but after 15mins with it on your head gets sick and you have to shut off the ir imiter.But the hoel reason why i bought the kit was for Crysis 2.Crytek put 3 years of 3d reasearch into the game. (other thoughts ...i wish i could play killzone on my pc)

MightyWings
MightyWings

For guys bulls***g 3D. i think this is the natrual evolution to 2D gaming. sure it needs a little refinement but then so does everything else :) As far as it being bad for eyes is concerned, i think they said the same for CRT TVs when they came out. now we have LEDs an plasmas.I think if you can afford it then go for it. If not theres nothing else that you can do other then wait and maybe it'll be good cus then technilogy might have improved slightly when you are able to afford it. oh an for Bluray, lweill what more to say then PS3 FTW.

Anthony414
Anthony414

3D allows to better anticipate stuff when gaming? Who wrote this? Ask any competitive gamer out there they'll tell you 3D interferes negatively on their ability to play the game. It's a fun and immersive gimmick but I'd definitely not go online with it. It's just a trade off. With 3D you're like "waow things pop out", then you get bored of it, switch back to 2D and you're like "waow the image quality is so much nicer". Just make your pick.

Anoush13
Anoush13

Avatar? You mean that 2 and half hour Pocahontas ripoff with a stupid 3D gimmick to boost up sales?

starduke
starduke

3D is a gimmick, always has been, always will be. A gimmick which can give people headaches.

Finy
Finy

Amazing that we have this technology too many years in the past. Looking forward to get one of the DSi 3D. It is ok or what happen if I use lenses or spectacles?

killer690
killer690

- The main reason for the failure of the virtual boy was the fact that graphics didn't really popped out, and it just looked red and tiresome, and the new technology may be awesome, but it is way too expensive for some people (me included), So my guess is that people are going to opt for a cheaper LCD or regular LED tv screen instead of buying the more expensive but totally awesome LED 3D capable screen -

Reggie_p75
Reggie_p75

@apocalypsehorse - You're friendly aren't you? Toy Story 3 isn't REAL 3D.. it's simulated 3D.. end of.. @sabas10 - to quote your own post '..3D-telly's (actually this is a fake name because it isnt in 3D, but in 3D-ready or 2D-popup)' Now about these different types of 3D that exist :-s ... There's Full HD 3D, REAL 3D, multi-dimensional 3D (or 4D).. So which is 3D then??? In my opinion, if it doesn's simulate stereoscopic, free-focusing depth of field 3D.. then it aint REAL 3D. So for now, with me apparently not knowing what I'm talking about, you carry on enjoying your 'whatever you wish to call it REAL, TRUE, FULL HD 3D' experience while I'll just enjoy it when the real thing comes along. Good day (in full HD 3D)

austin_miushi
austin_miushi

Speedy scenes like some in avatar results in a blurry an messy image. So i've decide to wtach the movie again in classic 2D. So my point is: 3D it's fun it's great but has no chance at all to replace neat 2D images. I'm gonna get those glasses for the PS3 for sure. I'm gonna enjoy it too. It is true that you end up kindda tired after a long session of 3D. That's why 2D films and games of the past survived easly against 3D. Same old story, of the same fight.

kidvenom2001
kidvenom2001

@ IceQBkid Um it didn't quite say that. It stated that for SOME people it could be bad. Just the same a seizure inducing lights. You take precaution before you use any said product. Almost everything has warnings, and just because you read one here doesn't mean this is more of a priority then eating rotten cheese that has been unrefrigerated, and didn't bother reading the package warning. I can only see a flop in the battle, but not the war. IF it does flop it will re-introduce itself again, and again, and again. And, the tech won't be the reason for the flop. It will be the price. But this is supply and demand. If people start incorporating this stuff into your daily lives then prices will drop, but it has to break that initial unknown supply mark. I personally can't see this tech ever going away. We have way to many smart people in our world for that to happen. And I am even convinced that consumer halographic media will also come within the next 2 or 3 decades. Humans + brains + curiosity + science = cool shhh in the future.

cheolho
cheolho

Nintendo 3DS's resolution is only 400 x 240? Come on... That's lower than the PSP! The Iphone's resolution is 960 x 640.

IceQBkid
IceQBkid

Has anyone bothered to read the last page? 3D tech is bad for ur eyes...I wish it wasnt i really do but unless we evolve into some higher beings i do think 3D will flop over time

HonorOfGod
HonorOfGod

@ FFX13_GOW3_RE5 I see.. if that is true than.. screw 3D?

FFX13_GOW3_RE5
FFX13_GOW3_RE5

@HonorofGod because it has a very limited viewing angle.

HonorOfGod
HonorOfGod

If you have never seen anything 3D you must be living under a rock.. 3D has been around for years heck even cereal boxes have it at times. This will work but It should not cost so much. If anything why dont they invent something to put over your screen like you do with a PSP protector and make it so it shows the picture in 3D. Sounds so much cheaper but eh..

Sukharevskaya
Sukharevskaya

3D in movies and games is another ploy to reap as much money as possible with providing a cruddy experience.

domz_dream
domz_dream

All I can say is: I cannot wait for Dead Space to come out in 3D. --bring on the fear--

bowie414
bowie414

Just close one eye and see what happens... Try it a few times while playing a game, watching tv, or even looking at pictures. Monocular 3D - your brain always searches for depths cues and when you only peer through one eye, it doesn't realize you are looking at 2D surface. Try it, like a pirate...