Eve Online, Minecraft, more hit by LulzSec

Internet hacking group targets CCP MMOG, Mojang indie hit, League of Legends, and The Escapist in distributed denial of service attacks.

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Yesterday, hacking group Lulz Security--aka LulzSec--breached Bethesda Softworks' websites, grabbing information from some 200,000 Brink player accounts in the process. Today, the hacker collective--which has also targeted Sony and Nintendo--is continuing to lay siege to a range of Internet gaming properties with distributed denial of service (DDOS) attacks.

Calling its attack "TitanticTakeoverTuesday," LulzSec began by bringing down The Escapist, an online video game magazine. It has since returned to normal operation.

Next in line for LulzSec was CCP Games' sci-fi massively multiplayer online role-playing game Eve Online. The hacking grouped claimed responsibility for bringing down its login servers, with the game's website suffering an incidental outage. CCP confirmed the attack through its own Twitter account.

Yes, this is LulzSec's official logo.
Yes, this is LulzSec's official logo.

"Earlier we became aware of a DDoS and took all services offline," reads the message. "Our Security Team is conducting a thorough investigation."

Another LulzSec-affected party today was indie hit Minecraft. The hacking group took credit for bringing down the game's website and servers this afternoon. However, all systems have been restored as of press time, according to a message from Minecraft creator Markuss Persson.

The security breaches did not end there, however. LulzSec also claims to have brought down free-to-play title League of Legend's login servers, which made it so gamers could not access the title. While the title's developer, Riot Games, has not commented on the matter, many League of Legends players took to the game's official forums to express their feelings on the situation.

LulzSec doesn't aim its efforts at game-related sites exclusively. The group has recently broken into high-profile institutions like the United States Senate, the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), and Sony Pictures, among others.

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