Documentary to tell the story behind That Dragon, Cancer

Watch the teaser for the documentary about the creation of That Dragon, Cancer.

An upcoming documentary called Thank You For Playing will tell the story behind That Dragon, Cancer, a game about the challenges developer Ryan Green and his wife Amy faced dealing with their son Joel’s terminal cancer.

The film follows the creation and growing success of the game as the Greens continue to care for their son. It is being produced by a team of two, David Osit and Malika Zouhali-Worrall.

"We flew out to Colorado to meet the Greens last summer, and we've been filming with them ever since," the filmmakers told Gamasutra. "We hope that Thank You For Playing can help capture an exciting moment in the evolution of the popular perception of gaming. Ryan, Amy and their development team are true artists, and That Dragon, Cancer is a unique work of art - we've never seen anything like it before."

“We decided it was important that people see the parts of our lives in-between the scenes of the game,” Ryan Green said in a post to the game’s website. “Life happens in the middle and so does death. David and Malika were with our family the three days leading up to Joel’s passing.”

Thank You For Playing is still in production. That Dragon, Cancer is expected to launch this year exclusively on Ouya.

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg and Google+.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

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Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer in search of the Citizen Kane of burritos.

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Discussion

10 comments
eze_sl89
eze_sl89

As previous user posted here, why would anyone want to live though this suffering in the form of a game... Life sucks hard enough as it is, i don't need a game to make me more depressed.


Games are meant to make you forget about the problems and have a good time.

Thanatos2k
Thanatos2k

Cancer sucks and is really sad....we know....

apolloooo
apolloooo

i want to try this game, but too bad it's only on ouya

de-astroturfer
de-astroturfer

Certainly more thought provoking than most of the violence obsessed dross out there today, Keep up the good work Amy and Ryan I wish you every success with this game, its a message more people need to hear and understand, empathy should be a prerequisite ingredient of every game, I hope your work encourages more developers think more carefully about their games in this regard in future.  

TheGreatOldOne
TheGreatOldOne

I don't care much for VR headsets, but I would'nt hesitate one bit to buy one if TDC supported it. You guys have a fan in me, can't wait for the title's release.

immortality20
immortality20

As someone who survived cancer, lost his father to it, and saw my mom overcome breast cancer, I can somewhat relate to the horrible thought of seeing a child with it. Just breaks my heart thinking of it because I know all too well the horrors of chemo and surgeries. All the best to the family, all you can do is sadly take it one day at a time and try to keep positive (which can obviously seem impossible).

nazgoroth
nazgoroth

@immortality20  


Which brings me to the following... why would anyone want to live though this suffering in the form of a game... Life sucks hard enough as it is, i don't need a game to make me more depressed.

The only posible reason i could find is to raise awareness.

Hurvl
Hurvl

@nazgoroth Some people think that the average action "shoot/stab the bad guys" games don't evoke any feelings in them and they want to feel something when they play games. This would have a big chance of doing that, what with it being based on true events. It's the same reason why some people want to read biographies instead of completely fictional literature, the need for something that is based on real events.