Competitors would be 'scared' to embrace Sony's software - PlayStation boss

PlayStation exec Scott Rohde says innovation is "as important as anything," explains Battle Royale-Smash Bros. comparison "inevitable," says violence at E3 a result of more powerful technology.

Competitors would be "a little scared" to embrace Sony's software portfolio, PlayStation software product development head Scott Rohde told GameSpot in an interview during E3 2012 in Los Angeles last week. The comments came the day after Sony held its media briefing, during which the company highlighted several brand-new projects, including Quantic Dream's narrative-focused thriller Beyond: Two Souls (which will feature the voice and likeness of Juno actress Ellen Page) and Naughty Dog's postapocalyptic action game The Last of Us.

Sony's Scott Rohde.

On top of picking Rohde's brain about the importance of innovating rather than iterating, GameSpot questioned the executive about PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale and its similarities to Nintendo's flagship Smash Bros. fighting franchise. Rohde called comparisons people are drawing between the two properties "inevitable," and noted Battle Royale's dynamic battle arenas will set the game apart from Nintendo's.

Elsewhere in the interview, Rohde explained that the numerous scenes of ultraviolence at E3 2012 were the result of increased technical power for current consoles. He said the elephant-man lobotomy scene from God of War: Ascension and the shotgun-based head-removal encounter in The Last of Us are not "violence for the sake of violence." And in the case of Naughty Dog's game, such scenes will be used to build tension and tell a stronger story overall, he said.

Check out GameSpot's full interview with Rohde below.

GameSpot: Now that the "Big Three" conferences are over, what grabbed your interest, and what trends did you notice?

Scott Rohde: Of course I'm going to talk about Sony stuff first, because that is very exciting to me to see how everyone is going to react to what we show. Very excited about response to God of War: Ascension, Beyond: Two Souls, and The Last of Us. We kind of knew there would be a strong response to those. In general, just proud of the fact that we set out to show and prove that we have the best lineup of first-party exclusives and I think we succeeded in that area.

Ellen Page playing Jodie Holmes in Beyond: Two Souls.

In terms of the other stuff at the show, I don't think there were any surprising trends. I think that the industry is evolving and there's going to be a lot of reaching out from all, whether they're third-party software publishers or hardware manufacturers. Lots of reaching out into the mobile space. It's just natural evolution. Everyone's got a smartphone in their pocket. So there's definitely going to be a connection there. I think over time there will be many ways that it will enhance the gaming experience when you're away from your living room.

GS: The Sony briefing started off with Quantic Dream's new game, Beyond: Two Souls, which had been leaked earlier that morning…

SR: Everything gets leaked.

GS: And it stars Ellen Page, which I'm not sure anyone saw coming. How do you think Page's involvement in the game will affect the experience?

On Ellen Page's involvement in Beyond: Two Souls: "When you get professional, seasoned actors, they're going to make a difference in how that story is told."

SR: You heard David Cage just raving and drooling over the interaction with Ellen. He didn't just say, "Oh, that would be the right look." He wanted the personality, and I think she's going to have a profound effect. When you get professional, seasoned actors, they're going to make a difference in how that story is told. And that game, more than any game we do, is all about the story and the emotion behind those characters. Those guys are special in what they do, in finding new ways to tell stories. And new ways to create, really, an interactive film. And to start to bring that Hollywood talent in to pull that off I think is going to make a huge difference.

GS: Cage touted Ellen as a wonderful actress, but in the scene, she's just sitting there. She was barely talking, barely moving at all. I thought that was interesting.

SR: It is interesting. It's just kind of an ironic scene. I think for David, who is so into the emotion, to actually get an actor to do what she did in that scene is easier said than done. And it transformed into the scene you saw afterwards, where she was essentially a badass, right? So you saw both sides.

GS: The briefing also touched on PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale. You must be aware of the ties gamers are making to Nintendo's Smash Bros. series.

Battle Royale comparisons to Smash Bros. are "inevitable," says Rohde.

SR: Mm hmmm.

GS: Do you have a reaction to that?

SR: It's a natural connection. The bottom line is we just wanted a way to celebrate all of Sony's great IPs and have a fun way for them to duke it out together. It's so easy to compare any game to any other game. And as for that particular comparison: totally inevitable. But I'm really excited about where that game is going.

GS: So what differentiates Battle Royale from other games in the same vein?

SR: You've only seen probably two or three different environments, but the way they mash up all the different IPs in a very creative way. So not just talking about what actually happens in the battles between the characters, but everything that's going on in backgrounds, and affects what's going on with the battles themselves…I'd say that's a pretty big differentiator.

GS: Nintendo didn't talk about it at its press conference today, but there's gonna be another Smash Bros.

SR: They can both exist happily side by side. They're both ways to celebrate the wonderful IPs that the companies have created.

GS I was also surprised by Wonderbook. I didn't see it coming.

On Wonderbook: "The one thing that didn't leak!"

SR: The one thing that didn't leak!

GS: Can you talk more about Wonderbook and what it means for Sony and how it's going to work?

SR: Obviously, it's a way to broaden our audience. When you can hook up with a storyteller as brilliant as [J.K. Rowling] is, and find a way to tell stories in a different way, that's gonna broaden your audience. The way the technology works itself--we didn't go into this because there's just not enough time at a press conference. There's no tech in the book itself. It is cardboard and paper. The easiest way to describe it, is essentially there are AR codes. Everything is powered by the PlayStation 3. You will have one book; it's not an expensive piece of technology--it is not technology [laughs]. And everything is fueled by the PlayStation Eye and the PlayStation 3. You can download new pieces of content and open up your book and experience dinosaurs or solar system, or more J.K. Rowling content; whatever the case might be. When you really see kids' eyes light up is when they realize that it's a storybook and you can turn the pages and what you're doing is showing up on the screen, but when you can do this it's just fascinating because they've never had that kind of experience before. You're holding a book and it's coming alive on the screen and I'm totally in control of it.

GS: So you're definitely targeting the younger audience with Wonderbook?

SR: Absolutely. And families in general. We knew going in, if it wasn't obvious from the reception for God of War and The Last of Us, that's a bloodthirsty audience. So typically, they're not going to respond as enthusiastically to things like this in a press conference like that. I love the fact that Sony is willing to innovate in really different ways and that's a really good example of it. And I'm glad it didn't leak.

Sony's Wonderbook will open a new chapter for the company.

GS: Beyond J.K. Rowling, are there any other partnerships with authors lined up?

SR: We don't have any that we're talking about.

GS: Moving to the PS Vita, Sony said last month it sold 1.8M units since launch, and that software would be the key to success for the platform. You announced just yesterday Call of Duty and Assassin's Creed are hitting the Vita this year. What are your expectations for these games?

SR: We're thrilled to have those partnerships with those great franchises. And it's going to do nothing but enhance the PlayStation Vita and the overall experience. It's been out for about three months; there's 40 titles out there and another 60 coming in the next year, and we're glad that those two are a part of it. We're also glad that PlayStation All-Stars and Sly 4 will have Vita counterparts, and there's going to be very interesting ways that those games can interact with each other from PS3 to PS Vita.

GS: So do you think the PS Vita needs more big titles like Call of Duty and Assassin's Creed if it really wants to have success as a platform?

SR: It certainly doesn't hurt when you have those major franchises. I think what's going to be neat about the PlayStation Vita, and what didn't quite come through with the PlayStation Mobile announcement, is some of that content that is in development in the PlayStation Mobile world will end up on the Vita as well. There's going to be a very interesting mix of small, downloadable content, and bigger Call of Duty, Uncharted, Assassin's Creed-style games on the machine.

GS: We heard about it last year, but nothing this year. What's the status of the BioShock game for the Vita? Ken Levine seemed awfully excited about it last year.

SR: Unfortunately, I don't have news on that, because I'm a first-party guy. I don't have any update on that.

GS: Sony CEO Kaz Hirai laid out the company's restructuring plan last month, saying Sony will look to its games division to return to profitability. Was that a daunting message to receive?

"Essentially, we just say, 'Bring it on.' It makes us happy," explaining Sony leaning on its games division to return to profit.

SR: No. It's a flattering message to receive. Sony is a massive company with its arms everywhere. There are divisions of business that Sony runs that still baffle me because they have their arms everywhere. But for Kaz, with his roots in PlayStation, to have that new post and say, "We know that this is one of Sony's strongest pillars and we're going to lean on you guys." Essentially, we just say, "Bring it on." It makes us happy.

GS: So you don't feel any pressure?

SR: No. I think it's great now that Kaz is in that post from PlayStation, he recognizes the power of that brand and how it can extend across Sony's entire family of products. I think that's a really great thing, and we're thrilled to back that up.

GS: Ultraviolence has been a major theme of this year's E3, at least as I see it.

SR: You guys cheer louder when we do it! [laughs].

GS: Sony seems to be very welcoming to scenes of ultraviolence. We saw Kratos lobotomize an elephant guy and Joel from The Last of Us blow an enemy's head off to end the trailer. What's your take on the new level of violence in Sony's games?

"Let's face it: violent acts are what build the most tension; whether it's film or whether it's television or video games."

SR: There's a reason we have a ratings system for these games. And I think that you see this trend in Hollywood as well. You just see that as technology continues to grow, not just in our industry, but in the film industry as well, or even on television, I think you're gonna see a more realistic depiction of what's going on. And it's a way for people to escape. I don't think it turns people violent. But it's an interesting outlet for people to experience this, and let's face it: violent acts are what build the most tension; whether it's film or whether it's television or video games, and that was incredibly evident, specifically when we showed The Last of Us.

I mean, God of War kind of gets up to this level [motions his hand above his head] and just stays there. But with The Last Of Us, you don't know what's coming around the corner. I literally get goose bumps just thinking about it [motions to actual goose bumps on his left arm] because that's exactly what Naughty Dog set out to build: a title where you are terrified to walk around every single corner because there was going to be some sort of encounter. And you had to figure out how to deal with it. So that's the view I take on [violence]. It's an important part of building tension and creating a new style of entertainment for people. It's not violence for the sake of violence; there's a big difference. It's not Saw. Really, the violence is creatively used to tell a story and to build tension. And that's extremely important.

GS: What struck me about Beyond and The Last of Us is that though they are new games, new IPs, they feel very similar to Heavy Rain and Uncharted. And they also feel "safe," I would say. What's your take on this?

SR: It's an interesting take. I tend to look at it exactly the opposite way. If you can find another publisher in this industry who would build Beyond, I'd like to meet that publisher. I really think that [Beyond] is as far from "safe" as it gets. Heavy Rain, by itself was not a "safe" title. And to do it again with a totally different story, a larger investment, and to bring Hollywood in, to really enhance that genre that really isn't touched by many folks in our industry, I think is anything but "safe." And when you think about what Naughty Dog is doing, when I hear "safe" I hear Uncharted 4, Uncharted 5, Uncharted 6, Uncharted 7. And for a developer of that caliber, this late in the cycle of the platform, to introduce a totally new IP for a different audience--meaning going from T-rated to M-rated--I think is anything but "safe." I really feel like we're taking a lot of risks with both of those titles.

GS: I've heard Joel from The Last of Us referred to as Nathan Drake 2.0…

Joel from The Last of Us is not Nathan Drake 2.0, says Rohde.

SR: [laughs] I hear you to a degree. And at the risk of sounding defensive, the guys from Naughty Dog have put so much work into crafting those characters. And it's so funny; if [Naughty co-president Christophe Balestra] were sitting here right now, he would literally give you five thousand reasons why Joel is different than Nathan Drake. Let's face it; you watch any movie in Hollywood, there's gonna be a male lead with some scruff. It's just what happens. But if you really compare them side by side, they're really different characters.

GS: How important is it to Sony to innovate rather than iterate?

SR: It's as important as anything. The fact that we can have The Unfinished Swan, and we can have Beyond, and we can have The Last of Us, and God of War. Of course with some titles you're going to iterate; a sports title is a great example. But to have that wide range and to offer something new, like Wonderbook. I say this every time like a broken record; our press conference could have been twice as long because we have that much content that we could show, we just didn't have time to show it all. Sound Shapes is another perfect example. These are all innovations that other companies would be a little scared to embrace, I believe. So innovation is top of the charts at PlayStation.

GS: [Sony president] Andrew House said yesterday that Sony is always looking to the future, but he didn't lay out any kind of specific plan. We know the PlayStation 4 is coming; how are you preparing to build games for it?

"This industry is constantly evolving. There's going to be fingers reaching out into the mobile space; it's going to be a big part of how all home consoles work, specifically ours."

SR: I'm not going to talk about future platforms, but as a software organization, I think we have an extremely talented group of studios. And we're always preparing, we're always looking five years out with what we do. And not in the sense that you might think where it's sequels to every game we have in production. It's not like that. It's absolutely to figure out new ways to innovate and new ways to bring in new talent. Because we know that this industry is constantly evolving. There's going to be fingers reaching out into the mobile space; it's going to be a big part of how all home consoles work, specifically ours. We're always planning for that. Can I really get into specifics about what we're doing? Not really. But we are absolutely preparing for that. I wouldn't have a job if we weren't doing that.

GS: I have to ask, just because…I have to ask. Is there an update on The Last Guardian? We know development is stalled, but does the game have a heartbeat?

SR: I will not give you a detailed update, but I will say one thing and it goes back to innovation and to gamers and to quality. That title is going to ship when it's absolutely ready.

GS: So it's going to ship?

SR: It's going to ship at some time, and it's going to ship when it's ready. And I think that's a really important thing to remember, is that it would be very easy to ship a game when it's not quite ready because we need to meet a business plan. Gamers are first, and the experiences we provide are first. And that's why we're gonna talk about that game when we're ready to talk about it.

Written By

Eddie Makuch is a news editor at GameSpot, and would like to see the Whalers return to Hartford.

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Discussion

109 comments
MooncalfReviews
MooncalfReviews

No, violent acts don't build the most tension. Tension in is built by the threat of violence, not the constant portrayal of it.

 

Evidence: Breaking Bad. Did anyone see the episode last week where they dismembered the kid's bike and burned it in acid, and all the time you're thinking 'holy crap they have to do this to the kid's body next!" But they don't show the kid at all, other than his hand sticking out of the dirt as the guy digs his body out. They only had to show the bike being cur up and melted for you to imagine that happening to the kid's body next. Guess what? Tension all over your face.

Matt-F
Matt-F

"Let's face it: violent acts are what build the most tension; whether it's film or whether it's television or video games."

 

Tension arises from conflict that seems signifcant, and violence rarely seems truly significant. It only routinely works in games to some extent because your own conflict is at stake. But generally this is a very primitive view of tension.

bluespire1
bluespire1

Sony Good software but Hardware sucks...

ydnarrewop
ydnarrewop

I liked Sony's E3. It illustrated that Sony is still game-centric. I was even intrigued by the Wonderbook. I could see my little girl using it. I wish Sony well  :)

SquareEnixFan13
SquareEnixFan13

The Last Guardian...I want The Last Guardian....so many questions.

theshonen8899
theshonen8899

I like Jack Tretton a lot but I'm not a fan of Scott Rhode. He's too bullish, needs to stop feeling so insecure about PlayStation and just chill out. Everyone just need to stop being so competitive overall.

ElFlechero
ElFlechero

"she's just sitting there. She was barely talking, barely moving at all." Just sitting there and ACTING, how strange! 

 

Also, it's important to note that when he said it's "not violence for the sake of violence", he wasn't talking about God of War. Cause that would be ridiculous, that's totally what GoW is about.

zinoalex
zinoalex

Wonderbook didn't leak because no one really wants it!

   How about taking all the time and effort spent on Wonderbook and release a new downloadable firmware the re-installs the "emotion engine" in the PS3. Thereby letting us play our PS2 games on the PS3 console-AGAIN!!!! Like it USED TO BE!!!

warhawk-geeby
warhawk-geeby

Well I've read the entire interview and honestly don't know where half of your comments are coming from..  Maybe it's just biased views and fanboys, who knows..

 

The way see it Sony are up to their waist in trouble, hell maybe even their neck.  But that's as an overall business, not the Playstation brand.

 

It's extremely comforting to know that Kaz is placing so much faith in their console division of the market to save them, mainly because that will mean more investment in the future.

 

When I look at the other gaming companies I really don't see anything to get amazed about, Nintendo were showing off Batman for the WiiU - a game which will be over a year old by the time their 'next gen' console gets it.  Microsoft however seemed to do the same old reliance of their big hitters, a new Halo developed by a different company, and a new Gears seemingly by the pressure Microsoft.  Both of which just shout one thing to me - the original developers want to MOVE ON.

 

Yes Sony may be copying Nintendo's Smash Bro's, and it's obvious that they will also attempt to replicate Microsoft's smart-glass in some way or another..  But as a dedicated gamer it's refreshing to know Sony are still wiling to push out entirely new IP's so late in the console's life.

 

The fact Microsoft and Nintendo are skipping Gamescom show they'e all but given up with this gen.

kuninushi
kuninushi

This guy is full of bullshit. But I guess it's part of his job. Pretty good interview questions GS!

RealFabioSooner
RealFabioSooner

"GS: Ultraviolence has been a major theme of this year's E3, at least as I see it.

SR: You guys cheer louder when we do it! [laughs]."

 

I'll never take any press complaints about games being too violent seriously anymore. He's dead right - the people on the conference are not only gamers, but press people. In the real world outside press offices, titles like Heavy Rain, Mario and Journey sell lots more than 95% of all the violent games released in the last few years. But the press needs a shtick, so let's show lots of stills and videos from the lesser sellers (and the occasional violent game to reach the 5%, such as CoD or GTA) and make sure the wrong impression is implanted in everyone's minds.

 

Good job.

-The-G-Man-
-The-G-Man-

it's definitely hilarious that the only thing he could come up with that was different from Smash Bros. was "well...uh...the stages, i guess?"

eternal_blade3
eternal_blade3

Much as like Harry Potter, the Wonderbook thing just seems like a dumb idea. Also, I don't care what you say, Sony has copied Nintendo. Again. At least Kinect didn't give players a motion controller that they had to hold, unlike the PS Move.

 

Beyond: Two Souls and The Last of Us look awesome in regards to exclusives, but the credit there goes to the individual developers.

XanderZane
XanderZane

Too much to read. Only games I'm interesting in are Beyond & The Last Guardian. Battle Royale doesn't impress me.

shadowdisciple
shadowdisciple

I know his comment may rub people the wrong way but I don't think he's wrong. Off the top of my head the only game franchises of Sony's that have appeared on all three Playstation consoles is Gran Turismo and Twisted Metal. For the most part Sony tries to bring new content instead of just pumping out more from the same franchises over and over. And when you consider how often gamers complain about companies being scared to make new IP's and instead just play it safe with sequel after sequel his point becomes even more valid.

grognard
grognard

It's times like these that make it abundantly clear whey Sony is in the sad shape they're in.  They still maintain the hubris and bluster from old accomplishments without realizing how out of touch they appear when most of their competitors hardly even consider Sony competition anymore.

Sony lost about 60% market share this generation globally and are reduced to begging third-party developers to release games on their system and they can still convince themselves that the competition is scared of them?

Carpetfluff
Carpetfluff

This is pure spin based the back of quite few gaming sites raising concerns about how much of press conference content was based on the spiralling levels of violence on show.

Landsharkk
Landsharkk

After reading all of the above, I found this quote rather interesting, because it contradicts what Sony has said a couple weeks ago:"Let's face it: violent acts are what build the most tension; whether it's film or whether it's television or video games." 

 

Sony was recently quoted as saying other console gamers (indirectly pointing a finger at Xbox 360) can't appreciate games that are emotionally involved and that have strong character and story development. Sony was essentially saying Xbox 360 players only care about fast action and violence (i.e. they aren't mature enough to enjoy the PS3).

 

And now Sony is quoted in saying that violence builds the most tension and then goes on to explain how the ultra violent acts showing in God of War and Last of Us are somehow innovative.  

tightwad34
tightwad34

How is Kratos ripping open a skull or a shotgun to the face new or innovative violence? I think it would take something pretty damn dramatic for us consumers to say anything other than meh to "new violence".

Vodoo
Vodoo

This phony sounds more like a PR person than anything else. Should've asked him why Sony's TV's are such a piece of sh!t, yet they're still demanding a premium price for them. 

fightingfish18
fightingfish18

Seeing as I don't really like SSB, I want to see if Battle Royale can do it better.  I loved n64 smash, appreciated gcn smash, not a fan of brawl at all.

 

The Last of US and Beyond are day 1 buys.

Karjah
Karjah

Well I think Sony won the "game as art" awards this year with The Last of Us and Beyond.  It just killed me to see MS waste a third of their press confrence on sports and sport related services on xbox. 

 

Sadly I don't think the gamer won with e3 this year.  Sony did an ok job doing what every console should have done..show us some great new games that are not just a clone of whats already out there and even then Sony had to show a few clones. 

 

Argh!

Scorch_22
Scorch_22

Can we stop talking about Last Guardian. All we know about the game is there is some kid who feeds and rides on a flying chihuahua. Hardly note-worthy.

Matt-F
Matt-F

Ah, crap I meant "because your own progress is at stake". I had to rewrite my comment and there was some signal loss in doing it quickly...

MooncalfReviews
MooncalfReviews

I'm not a Sony fan at all. I find their company arrogant, and frankly a little corrupt.

 

However! I do agree with you. Their exclusive are making me FAR more interested than the exclusives promised to either of the other consoles, or the PC (who only seems to get MMO exclusives, and MMOs need to die already).

02050muh
02050muh

 @warhawk-geeby smart glass? lol.. they need to emphasize n improve more on remote play on playstation portable devices!!

02050muh
02050muh

 @-The-G-Man- i dont mind competitions...last few years, when games like crash team racing, chocobo racing n mario kart came out, nobody give a damn about innovation or iteration, we just play games to have fun, but nowadays......

rarson
rarson

 @eternal_blade3

 

Except Sony was demoing the technology behind Move back in 2001 on the PS2. So they weren't copying Nintendo at all (but I will say this: Sony doesn't seem to have the balls to launch risky products until other companies can demonstrate a marketability for them).

02050muh
02050muh

 @XanderZane i remembered playing one piece grand battle 2 when i see battle royale footage...even though i'm not that into it, but let's hope it will do well on both ps3 n ps vita. i heard there will be cross-platform which is gonna be awesome!

RealFabioSooner
RealFabioSooner

 @shadowdisciple And the fact that Sony isn't winning the console race by leaps and bounds is clear proof that most of the press and the audience don't really care about new IPs at all, no matter how much they say they do.

 

It's like retro-compatibility. Everyone says they want it so badly that not having it is a dealbreaker, but I bet not even 10% of the most hardcore gamers ever use it in any console they have, and those who use it never clocked more than a handful of hours playing Gamecube games on the Wii, Xbox titles on the 360 or PS2 ones on the phat PS3.

 

A little less talking, more action, people.

Hurvl
Hurvl

 @grognard I believe that he's referring to all the innovative ideas/IP:s that he thinks Sony has. The competition might not be scared of them financially speaking (drawing customers away from them), but he seems to think that Sony are taking lots of risks with their new projects. Taking risks is what big companies are scared of.

kantankoras
kantankoras

 @Landsharkk I think his point was that the violence in Last of Us is used as a dramatic, story telling tool. The threat of violence is what will make you act in the game. Now, having a constant going hum of explosions and gunfire is hardly good use of violence to create drama. Naughty Dog does a good job of quieting their games down, and having the action/violent segments come in bursts, not like the waterfall of action-gasms that Call of Duty has been serving since day 1. We've seen a million headshots (and done a million ourselves) and somehow, people still gasped when that one dude in Last of Us gets shot. It's dramatic, not run of the mill.  

But honestly, acting like God Of War isn't mindless blood worship is stupid. They should be clearer on their stance, you're right.

blackwing55
blackwing55

 @Landsharkk They didnt say violence thats just your speclation even if they did its not a true contridiction because there using the violence as a story driver rather than fast paced action with no story.

i-like-me
i-like-me

 @Landsharkk I think the point he is trying to make is there is a difference between violence for the sake of it like COD and violence to build tension and make the experience better like the last of us, deus ex, heavy rain that kind of thing.

kantankoras
kantankoras

 @tightwad34 Technologically, the elephant was pretty gruesome detailed.

 

As for Last of Us, it was violence being used sparingly and at the right times to make you feel it, instead of the "tap L1, tap R1, tap L1, tap R1" of Call of Duty.

Hig1134
Hig1134

 @Vodoo Why would you ask a Playstation Exec about Sony's TV division? You're a butthurt Xbot? Yeah....I thought so.

RealFabioSooner
RealFabioSooner

 @Karjah I wish showing sports and entertainment content were the biggest problem during the Microsoft conference. No matter how little interest I have in it, the fact remains that the console is being heavily used in such a way, and that's where the money is for them at the end of the console life. Since I own an Xbox too, I don't want them to bleed money.

 

The REAL problem was that Microsoft buried their own franchises in that conference. THAT is worrisome. Their biggest bet was denied the brighest and rightful spot at the end of the conference to cater to one more CoD game. I don't care that it sells more than Halo, you're talking YOUR BIGGEST IP. Gears Judgement, Fable the Journey and Forza Horizon all had less screen time than third-party games, and while one can make an excuse for Gears, Fable and Forza will be released in justa  few months. That says a LOT about MS's confidence on these games' performance.

 

Now compare it with Sony. Assassin's Creed III sells way more than God of War and it didn't prevent Sony from giving way more screen time and a better spot to it. Heck, THEY OPENED UP AND ENDED THEIR CONFERENCE WITH NEW IPs. Gamespot tried hard to spin it calling Beyond and Last of Us "safe bets", but the fact still is THEY ARE NEW IPs. And in this economy just being one, no matter who makes them, is a bold move. Compared to the other manufactures it gets even bolder.

Landsharkk
Landsharkk

 @Karjah 

It's the last E3 before the big announcement of next gen consoles.  In the cycle of consoles and E3's, this one was pre-determined to lack substance compared to other E3's.  

 

Next year's E3 should be quite the opposite, however.

blackwing55
blackwing55

 @Scorch_22 There excited for it because shadow of the colussus was such a great game that they feel that the producer would make another wonderful game.

MooncalfReviews
MooncalfReviews

 @rarson 

Actually, all motion controller hardware is copying Nintendo, even the EyeToy. Nintendo made the Powerglove way back in the 90's for the NES. Plus, the PC did EyeToy / Kinect style stuff before Xbox or Playstation.

blackwing55
blackwing55

 @Hurvl this is especially frighting considering how sick gamers are of playing the same kind of games at least sony is bring in diffrent ideas and are leaned on helping the consumer rather than bleed them dry.

Scorch_22
Scorch_22

 @blackwing55 Yeah, you're right, SotC was a great game, so it explains why everyone is drooling over this one. I guess I just get tired of seeing games in development limbo get so hyped up.

rarson
rarson

 @MooncalfReviews 

 

First of all, Nintendo had absolutely nothing to do with the Power Glove. Secondly, it doesn't come close to doing even what the EyeToy by itself can do. It collects hand gesture information, that's it.