Cloud-gaming platform OnLive adds its first free-to-play game

Gaijin Entertainment's War Thunder now available through OnLive; plus, company hires former Gaikai executive.

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The War Thunder log-in page at OnLive

Cloud-gaming company OnLive announced today that Gaijin Entertainment's free-to-play MMO War Thunder is now available through their service. It's the first free-to-play game available through OnLive, the company points out. War Thunder is currently available on PC and PlayStation 4 (in Europe, at least).

War Thunder for OnLive also works with the company's CloudLift subscription ($7.95/month), allowing subscribers to play the game wherever they want without re-downloading it. Progress and purchases are synced through the cloud, so there's no need to worry about that.

OnLive explains that War Thunder through OnLive "massively lowers" the recommended PC specifications, and notes that the game can even be played on an Android tablet, so long as you have a Bluetooth controller. This is the first time War Thunder has ever been playable on a tablet.

"OnLive is making it possible for our millions of War Thunder fans to jump into combat quickly, wherever they are and on whatever device they're carrying," Gaijin Entertainment CEO Anton Yudintsev said in a statement. "We're looking forward to engaging our current players more deeply and more often, while bringing new users into our game."

War Thunder now has 6 million registered users, up from 5 million, the company adds. You can try a 30-minute demo of War Thunder through OnLive at the game's product page.

That's not the only announcement OnLive had to make today. The company also announced this morning that it has hired James Alan Cook as its general counsel and senior vice president of business and legal affairs. Cook previously worked at the Sony-owned Gaikai under the same title, and also held positions at Atari and The 3DO Company.

"OnLive is poised to create enormous waves in the ways that interactive games and other consumer and commercial software products are delivered to their target audiences," Cook said in a statement.

For more about OnLive, check out the platform's website.

Eddie Makuch is a news editor at GameSpot, and you can follow him on Twitter @EddieMakuch
Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Discussion

9 comments
Garm31
Garm31

Cloud gaming?.... Oh ya! That's the future anti and non physical ownership, 100% control the industry(MS) wants. If I don't physically own it on a disc or hard drive, then I won't buy it.

TERMINATOR-SSD
TERMINATOR-SSD

Onlive good idea if fact it could very well be the future of gaming consoles, just that its terrible quality right now.  

nero2142
nero2142

I wish they could stream console games... well even if they could they wouldn't be allow to ;d

SavageEvil
SavageEvil

Didn't even think these guys were still around. I wonder how they are doing?

hystavito
hystavito

@TERMINATOR-SSD  Fully streamed is the future, albeit not one that we might all like, for various reasons we've seen discussed many times.  I feel kinda bad for OnLive though, because I think they will get drowned out later by similar services.  That happens a lot I guess, early pioneers can't beat the big players when the thing becomes mainstream.

deadpeasant
deadpeasant

@SavageEvil  Pretty well actually. They are in the top 10 highest earning free to play games at the moment I believe. Its a great game to. The first Free to play I really like.