Birthing Super Meat Boy

GDC 2011: Team Meat dissects last year's breakout platformer, says PC release on Steam outperformed Xbox Live, and team is now working on 3DS dev kits.

Who was there: Programmer Tommy Refenes was there in the flesh, while artist Edmund McMillen joined in via Skype to recap and dissect the development of Super Meat Boy.

Meat!

What they talked about: After some technical tinkering, Refenes welcomed the audience to the postmortem, which he described as "the story of Meat Boy, peppered with various good and bad things." He preemptively apologized for a lack of preparation for the talk by explaining that it's so personal for him and McMillen that it seemed silly to write anything down about it.

McMillen talked about the original Meat Boy Flash game, saying he made it in about three weeks and hadn't thought it would be anything terribly popular. Refenes entered the picture when the two ran into each other at a previous year's GDC. They had previously known each other from the early days of Newgrounds, when they were affiliated sites that linked to one another. The two first worked on a Flash game called Grey Matter to see if the collaboration would work.

Satisfied with the results, the two agreed to make a console game. Refenes thought Meat Boy would be a strong starting point for the pair and a more appealing project to him personally than what he had been working on at the time. Around the same time, McMillen had been talking to Nintendo about bringing Meat Boy to WiiWare and had also been working on Gish 2 (a follow-up to a previous indie release he worked on) with an eye to release that game on Xbox Live Arcade.

Work on Super Meat Boy began in February 2009, when Refenes started rebuilding the engine of his previous project, Goo, to accommodate the needs of his dream 2D platformer. Describing the way Super Meat Boy moves in the air as "a lot of duct tape physics" with no guiding formula, Refenes said he tinkered with the engine for two months just to get movement to feel right. McMillen said he was essentially sitting on his hands until about June or July of that year, when Refenes had the level editor working.

Once they started showing off the in-development game at conferences, McMillen said he and Refenes fell "blindly in love" with Super Meat Boy, expanding the scope from a simple platformer with about 100 levels and no bosses to the game it eventually became. While that made the project significantly more time consuming and difficult, Refenes said it seemed like a shame to not run with the game and make it everything it could be.

Around the same time, McMillen said he and Refenes were trying to convince Microsoft that Super Meat Boy was something people would like. He said there was one person within Microsoft who believed in the game, but concessions had to be made. Specifically, they had to fight for months to limit the exclusivity window with Microsoft, allowing for the PC version of Super Meat Boy to be released by the end of 2010.

Refenes said he did get a version of the engine up and running on the PlayStation 3, but Sony was less than interested in pursuing the project. Even if Sony didn't get back to them, that bit of extra work did allow Refenes a little leverage over Microsoft. When someone within the Xbox 360 maker questioned Refenes' ability to get the game done on multiple platforms at the same time, he shot back that he'd gotten the game up and running on the PS3 within four days, so if Microsoft turned them down, they were ready to take Super Meat Boy to Sony.

Though Super Meat Boy has garnered plenty of critical acclaim, Refenes said he and McMillen were still incredibly stressed about entering the game into the 2010 Independent Games Festival. The evening before the IGF finalists were announced, Refenes said he thought he was having a heart attack worrying about making the cut. As for McMillen, he said one of the main reasons he was appearing via Web chat instead of in person was that he considers GDC and the IGF a major source of stress.

Team Meat wanted to bring the game to more platforms, but Refenes said the extra work would have killed him.

"With the IGF, you go into it thinking if you don't make it in, you're a loser. And it's hard not to think that way, especially when there's so much riding on it," McMillen said, adding, "This is my baby. Is it totally ugly and I can't see it?"

McMillen said he went into the IGF feeling like he'd overstayed his welcome. Some of his friends in the community believed he shouldn't have entered the IGF because he'd already won before for his work on titles like Gish and Braid, which won awards in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Refenes pointed out, "They're forgetting that I hadn't won ****."

Although it was nominated for the Seumas McNally Grand Prize and Excellence in Audio categories, Super Meat Boy took home no awards from the 2010 IGF. Regardless, McMillen said his days of entering the competition are over.

After GDC, it was time to work on the Electronic Entertainment Expo build of the game. The IGF and E3 showings of the game pushed the completion of Super Meat Boy back several months, McMillen said, because they spent so much time polishing certain parts of the game to show at the events and overall development was dragged back as a result. Refenes said he would wake up at 8 a.m. and work until 11 a.m. the next day trying to squash bugs and get the game in shape for E3.

Once at the shows, Refenes said it was great to see people play the game who were unable to put it down. That let them set aside whatever sadness and drama they had endured in the weeks leading up to the events.

Originally, the plan was to release Super Meat Boy right after Summer of Arcade. Microsoft had already told them about how much better Summer of Arcade titles do on average, so Refenes said there was no way they were going to miss the next opportunity to make a promotion. That promotion wound up being the fall Game Feast lineup, which Refenes knew they had to make. He had -$853 at the time, so it was imperative that they make their Game Feast deadline and start bringing some money in.

McMillen said that for the two months leading up to the release of the game, he and Refenes took no days off and slept no more than five hours a night. Refenes said he thought he was going to die, but wouldn't allow it to happen until after the game was done. As bad as McMillen said it was for himself, he acknowledged it was worse on Refenes, who was the only one of the pair with the programming skills to fix bugs.

"It's a bad practice in development to be going through bug fixing as you're implementing features," Refenes deadpanned, adding that he wound up thinking through many bugs while he slept.

McMillen said that was part one of hell. Part two was the launch. As the final release of Game Feast, Super Meat Boy was projected as selling on par with Hydrophobia. That worried McMillen and Refenes to no end when Hydrophobia came out and there were only 10,000 people on the leaderboards in the first week. A week later, Comic Jumper came out, with its leaderboards performing only marginally better.

At that point, Refenes said they were somewhat resigned to a grim fate. Things got a bit worse when it came out that Double Fine Productions' Costume Quest was also coming out the same day as Super Meat Boy, even though part of the Game Feast promotion was supposed to be a guarantee that each game would have the week to itself.

On the day of launch, Refenes said he turned on his Xbox 360, went to the Marketplace, and saw no trace of Super Meat Boy. The game went up late due to technical problems, and even when it was available on the store, it was relegated to the fourth-highest promoted slot on the Xbox Live dashboard, behind a car commercial and a "spooktacular" sale for already available Xbox Live content.

"The reason the game sold well was because of how we promoted it," Refenes said. It was the interviews that they did and the Metacritic score that drove interest, he said, with Microsoft offering very little support. McMillen said with the Game Feast games doing poorly out of the gate, it seemed like Microsoft wanted to distance itself from the promotion. He acknowledged it sounds weird to complain about it considering how well the game has done on Xbox Live, but, "It was a f****** mind****."

Unfortunately, Super Meat Boy won't be coming to the Wii after all.

Wrapping up the session in a hurry, McMillen said the game ended up performing better on Steam than it did on Xbox Live Arcade. Refenes echoed the sentiment, saying, "Everybody should love over Steam. Like all nasty love over Steam."

Refenes added there would be no WiiWare version of Super Meat Boy because they made a game too large for Nintendo's downloadable size limits. McMillen said a retail release was also out of the question, as he said no publisher wants to touch Wii retail right now. However, McMillen did say that Team Meat has 3DS development kits, though he wouldn't commit to the protein-rich platforming star making the jump to Nintendo's new handheld.

Quote: "We definitely wanted to do it on everything. But thinking about it now, if we'd done it on everything, I'd be dead. That's not a joke. Don't laugh."--Refenes, on why they scaled back platform plans for Super Meat Boy.

Takeaway: Delivering Super Meat Boy was a painful experience for both McMillen and Refenes, demanding significant sacrifices from both. And despite making a widely hailed game, they didn't know what sort of critical or commercial success it would garner in advance. As for Microsoft, Refenes said everyone on the creative side was great, but they didn't understand the business people.

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Discussion

109 comments
Joshua250
Joshua250

@TheRealLisaAnn Downloadable games have a different air than retailed games - they probably believed a game would be judged differently if you received a boxed copy (i.e. people might want "more" out of the game, even though there's a lot of content already). I also suppose it's due to a decline in Wii's popularity in 2010/2011.

giant11
giant11

This game was too hard for me :( I still liked it a lot, though.

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_ LOL What can I say? I spend--or some might say waste--a lot of time thinking about these things. (Also about life in general in the philosophical sense, but that's another totally irrelevant story. :) ) I don't want to take any credit away from McMillen or Refenes for the work they did. It's obvious they put their heart and soul into making SMB work and they deserve the credit they've gotten for its success. I don't know, however, that it's much less stressful for OTHER developers that end up getting their games panned for being unoriginal or "bad." Probably not QUITE as tough though. I'm just going to mention a few other things here to keep this short: Sonic has ALWAYS been slippery. I've played the old games and he stops about as slowly as he does in the 3D games. Despite what players stay, he's faster than he ever was. (Watch Colors or Unleashed speed stages.) So really, if he doesn't feel the same, IMO it's either because the old games aren't as good as people remember or WE'VE changed rather than the games. I personally categorize most all entertainment as art in some form, but I'm probably in the minority there. And because I want to reiterate this to as many people as I can, PLEASE go check out Chibi-Robo if you haven't. It's a tragedy to me that more people haven't played it. :)

TheRealLisaAnn
TheRealLisaAnn

"McMillen said a retail release was also out of the question, as he said no publisher wants to touch Wii retail right now." What is UP with this comment? I don't understand this.

rocka_
rocka_

@cachinscythe Damn, you do write a lot. xD I saw the first two comments, scroll down and saw "oh three comments", continued scrolling..."four?? FIVE??! =O ". lol but it's ok. About Sonic, I haven't played the new Sonic, but I have read some complains...but in my opinion, people don't complain so much about Sonic being slippery, but complain instead that it's not like it used to be. What I'm saying is that people don't like Sonic being slippery because is not the Sonic they were used too... Yeah, Mega Man X is a good example...it's not inovative in any way, but it's unique, it's a unique style, it's Mega Man style. Is a unique feeling. (Although nowadays there are games that play and almost feel like Mega Man...Battle Kid, for example). The same way Mega Man has its own feel and style, so does SMB. Thats why it is unique, it feels like SMB it has its own style...even using mechanics that other games already used, it uses them in is own way. Well about the marketing, I'll just mention that Team Meat made PETA create a game to mock them up, just so that more people were aware of SMB. Imagine what it takes to make a Organization such as PETA to create their own version of SMB (Called Super Tofu Boy http://features.peta.org/super-meat-boy-parody/ ) thinking that they were alerting people to their cause, without being aware that the one who push them into doing it was the same person who created SMB!! http://supermeatboy.com/65/Super_Meat_Boy_vs_Peta_/ The Crossovers are also part of marketing, cause the game has lot of secret characters that are character from other Games. It promotes other Indie Games and supports itself with those games. About VVVVVV(which also makes a presence in SMB as a crossovers), it's a Indie Hardcore Platformer. Check out the demo -> http://thelettervsixtim.es/ About the Art...Art is so subjective. It has the part of our own interpretation of course...not two persons look at the same object the same way. Thats why not all games are art, the same way not all films are art, not all paints, pictures, sculptures, "everythings" are art. But when someone achieves something like making a lot of people understand, behave, feel what or the way they are trying to transmit, that might be art. And it's understandable that more people will have an affinity with it, in other words, will like it.

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_The only game in the last console generation that I feel actually defied everything else from a technical standpoint was Katamari Damacy. At least, that's the only one that comes to mind. PHEW! Okay, done. Sorry this is such a long response. Just wanted to cover everything. :)

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_ FEELINGS: I probably haven't studied art and design enough to be able to counter what you've said. Honestly, I'm NOT a know-it-all and don't want to appear as one, so touche. However, if my girlfriend of 5 years just broke up with me, is it any fault of your own if I can't enjoy the "high quality" experience you present to distract me? IMO no it's not. And if I just won $50 million in a lottery, do you really think Superman 64 is going to seem like an awful game and be completely unfun? IMO no, it wouldn't. That's why I don't think it's fair to expect artists to overcome all our emotional trappings and why I believe WE have to play a part in drawing OURSELVES in. Though extreme examples, they imply a lack of control in other areas too. I actually wrote a long blog entry called "The Blame Game" on here that explains my views on this further. If you have time I'd appreciate you checking it out and leaving feedback. :) There ARE some games that feel very unique to me, among them Beyond Good & Evil and the woefully underrated Chibi-Robo (Seriously, check it out. IMO there's nothing else like it.), but from a technical standpoint, I KNOW that the things most of them present have been done before, and that it is therefore just an opinion I hold rather than some factual demonstration of uniqueness. (TBC)

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_ CROSSOVERS AND DIFFICULTY: I actually don't know anything about the marketing for this game, so I'll assume you're right about that stuff. Also, what is VVVVVV? I'm honestly drawing a blank. WHAT I LIKE: I actually enjoy most of the games that get released today, including those that are allegedly "mediocre." Some might conclude that I'm tearing down the claims to originality certain games have because I can't enjoy anything, but it's really the opposite. What I'm trying to do is get people to look at the "mediocre" stuff in a more positive light and the overpraised "good" stuff in a more negative light. Not that I don't enjoy most of the overpraised stuff; only that I don't enjoy it as much as the severe praise implies I should. (I'm actually going to continue playing SMB to see if eventually I'll understand why people enjoy it so much. I don't like to give up on things that easily.) And honestly, I CAN see distinct similarities in many of the things I play. You might say that SMB presents them in a unique way, but really what does that MEAN? Just that it's fun to play? Why does that prove it's unique? I enjoy Halo 3, but IT'S certainly not unique; it's just like the previous two Halos. And to hear you suggest that wall jumping, sprinting, and sliding haven't been put together before strikes me as silly. Maybe they haven't been put together with "Donkey Kong," but Mega Man X features the other three quite distinctly, and I'm sure there are others. (TBC)

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_ CONTROLS: First a clarification: I don't blame the controls for my performance with the game. I pretty much NEVER blame the controls for my performance (except occasionally with the Wii since it's not direct one-to-one control like standard games have). I am simply pointing out that I see a distinct similarity between the way this character controls and the "imprecise" controls gamers complain about in other games. Also, you say that he's slippery because he's made of meat, so it's okay for him to control that way. Well, I'd like to ask all gamers this: if you travel 100 MPH and then suddenly try to stop, will you stop automatically? No, you'll slide. That's physics. So really, the slippery nature of the controls in 3D SONIC THE HEDGEHOG games make sense too. Yet everyone *****es about the controls in those games being too loose. So if it's a problem in Sonic the Hedgehog, why isn't it a problem in Super Meat Boy? IMO it's because people are having so much fun with the game that they somehow christen the controls as being "fair" compared to a game less fun where they aren't having fun and need something to blame it on. But really, there isn't any difference, is there? If people enjoyed 3D Sonic games, I'm guessing they wouldn't even MENTION the controls at all. (TBC)

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_ Yes, you're right. What I'm dealing in is speculation. However, I've had experiences listening to gamers and reading reviews that make me think I'm onto something. A lot of gamers (it seems to me) tend to equate "fun" with "creative and unique and original." And in the rare instances where it's blatantly obvious that something unoriginal is fun or something original ISN'T fun, reviewers and consumers (IMO) seem to act like those are somehow different from unoriginal stuff that ISN'T fun or original stuff that DOES work. For example, when Unlimited Saga released, I read a negative review--which to be fair the game probably deserves--talking about how they were all for "experimenting" with new RPG concepts but (QUOTE) "...um, I like to WALK in my RPGs." Notice how "innovation" somehow got replaced with "experimentation" there? Why? Doing things differently IS innovating! The switch in words implies--though it does NOT confirm--that the reviewer is trying to keep the situation black and white by pretending the different things Unlimited Saga does don't COUNT as innovation. Why can't he just say, "Okay, so they innovated here, but I just don't like it."? Because that means admitting that maybe we got what we asked for: something different. Sorry, got sidetracked there. And again, I AM just speculating. Let me get back on topic.As a warning, I tend to be long winded, so I hope you'll bear with several comments in response to your own. (TBC)

widdowson91
widdowson91

@Rickystickyman: If you've not played all the Mario games you can't have a proper opinion. I don't need to add anything else there (you've obviously not played the original Mario games in their original formats - without save features). ''Mario games in my mind are there own genres. Ever wonder why they all get good reviews? It's because a Mario game never fails at being a mario game. That is the only reason they get good reviews is because a mario game is good because it is in the "Mario genre". Put a Mario game in the platformer genre and it is mediocre.'' This is complete bollocks. Mario is in a genre of its own because it obliterates any other form of platform game. In all honesty you just sound like one of those typical Nintendo haters (you know, the people who hate them because their games are colourful). Anyway I've had enough of talking to you.

Rickystickyman
Rickystickyman

@widdowson91 I admit that there are harder games, but just kind of compared to todays standards, I'm sorry but all Mario games are cake walks. I have not played one mario game (though I haven't played all of them so that puts a hole in my logic) but they are easy and repetitive repetitive repetitive. Another good example of a hardcore platformer would be VVVVV. Mario games in my mind are there own genres. Ever wonder why they all get good reviews? It's because a Mario game never fails at being a mario game. That is the only reason they get good reviews is because a mario game is good because it is in the "Mario genre". Put a Mario game in the platformer genre and it is mediocre.

seankkkk
seankkkk

This game is over rated. Wahh cry

mkaliaz
mkaliaz

@ blackace Good point, but I just wanted to mention it was a lot cheaper than that during the holiday season. I think I got my copy on Steam for under $4.

rocka_
rocka_

Continuing... 2) You really found the controls slippery? I find them really accurate. The character is slippery, not the controls...but that's part of him being made of meat, i guess...the same way is able to slide up walls, if he wasn't slippery he wouldn't be able to...i guess. 3)Yeah, lots of other games can be hard, frustrating and have fair controls. For example VVVVVV! But that doesn't make SMB less of what it is. And maybe the people who like it like other games like it. Or maybe SMB is the only one they know about. But thats just me speculating, the same way you speculate that people don't see the similarities with other games. =) You still didn't considered the Crossovers, and the marketing stunts about the game. Which are also a big part of the game being this famous. It's fine. You don't have to like it. I do like it, just like I like a lot of other games. To each one their own (games). =P Just out of curiosity...what games do you like?

rocka_
rocka_

@cachinscythe Well, I studied art and design, and an artist always tries to control the emotions people have when seeing or interacting with their piece of art, with the products they create. And as a Designer, I really do believe that can and IS controlled by the developer. Try watching Portal Developers Commentary for example, and you'll see if you were or were not controlled, if you did or didn't do what the developers wanted you to do. Or even see what Team Meat did to PETA, and see if they did or did not controlled PETA to promote their game without realizing it! And them tell if they can or cannot control what you feel or do. ;) 1) If you think that way, them there isn't a single game that can be original to you. Of course Save the princess, Walljump, and even Sprinting and Sliding on walls already have been done, but not like in SMB. And I don't know if they have all been made together. Since when does gamespot have a limit of characters? Continues...

widdowson91
widdowson91

@Rickystickyman: Super Mario The Lost Levels isn't annoying, its just hard. When you die it's not because the game feels cheap, it's because it was just your fault. I'd actually say Super Meat Boy is more annoying. Anyway your logic for what determines a 'hardcore' platformer is still wrong. Super MArio is more 'hardcore' then any other platform game. Why? Because when it comes to it Mario has the perfect blend of playability and difficulty. Super Mario Bros. 3, for example, is challenging, but you resepect the game for that. In all honesty Super Meat Boy isn't that difficult. For a game today it is (because a lot of games todya are super easy), but if you compare it to something like the original Ninja Gaiden and Castlevania games for the NES, or Zelda II, it's easy as hell.

umster
umster

would be pretty cool to have Meat Boy on the 3DS

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_ 2) IMO the controls are very slippery, which gets games like 3D Sonic the Hedgehogs condemned but is somehow overlooked here. And frankly, I've never encountered a control scheme I couldn't adjust to, and I find it ridiculous to hear gamers trying to claim it wasn't their fault they died. No people, it IS your fault. You just need to practice. 3) I have encountered just as much frustration playing SMB as I have any other difficult game. So I'm either in the minority, or gamers are too blind to see the similarities between it and other "unfairly" difficult games. This is just my take on it. I don't have a problem with people enjoying the game. I'm just not one of those people. And I really wish gamers were willing to consider that sometimes when we like something it's just because we like it, not because it's done something well or because it's done something "different."

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_ I totally respect and understand that attitude. In a way, that's my point. Something can FEEL original and unique without technically BEING original and unique. However, I'm not sure if what we FEEL is something that can be directly controlled by developers. In fact, I'm pretty sure it's not. What exactly can developers do to make a game FEEL fair when technically it contains elements that would be considered unfair in other games? I don't have any idea, and I'm guessing gamers don't really know either. Yet we want developers to play to that idea. Ironically, that seems very UNFAIR to developers if you ask me. With a reminder that I respect your opinion, I'm going to address some of the things you've pointed out. 1) If you really get down to it, NO game actually plays like any other. If the setting changes, it plays different. If another mechanic is introduced, it plays different. So yes, SMB doesn't play like any other game out there, but that doesn't make it any different from every other game released. And really, from a technical standpoint, what element does it provide that hasn't been done before? The levels are set up similar to Donkey Kong (Reach the princess and the villain carries her away), the wall jumping that's such a prominent part of it is in almost every quality 2D platformer created today...outside of the characters and animation, there isn't anything technically unique about it that I can think of. (TBC)

blackace
blackace

Super Meat Boy is a great game. It did better on STEAM because it cost less on STEAM. It was like $15 on XBL and like $8 on STEAM during the holidays when those specials were being run. I got mine for $10 on XBL when they had it on sale for 1 week. The game is hard at times and very challenge, but it's still a blast to play and should be in everyone's library.

rocka_
rocka_

@cachinscythe Hmm... I think that's the appeal of SMB. The game is really hard, but it doesn't seem unfair. The Controls are really good. It glitches sometimes, but most of the times, when you die, you know it was your own fault...It's not really a thing you see that much nowadays, games being that hard on purpose. Also, from my point of view I see some indie games as really old scholl games. Games like they used to be in the 80's. And that appeals to a lot of people. But even the gameplay of SMB... I don't recall seeing any game that plays just like it. It's not original, it's a 2D platformer, but the gameplay and the feel of SMB is unique. And add the crossovers, plus the dark world, the marketing stunts (like tofu boy), and even more stuff, the world around SMB makes it really be unique.

Rickystickyman
Rickystickyman

@widdowson91 that is a difference between hard, and annoying. Actually I have no problem with games like that because it means you actually have to try. But that isn't hardcore. Hardcore is basically you need to memorize the level to beat it. That is generally how the term hardcore platformer is used. Ever played the deep cave? Now that is tough.

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@Shardz7 Sure, just like the tides have turned in politics since Obama entered office. Oh wait...no they haven't. People need to get some new lines of thinking in the gaming spectrum. Corporate bigmen aren't always the money-grubbing jerks we paint them to be. And when they BECOME that way, they are forced to change cause they start losing money. Look at EA. It became money-hungry pumping out endless sequels to franchises, people caught on, it started to die, and it changed as a result. (Seriously, how many of EA's old franchises are actually alive and kicking today?) Wake up people. If the corporate bigwigs are pumping out unoriginal crap, it's because WE keep buying it. The market gives us what we ask for. If we start wasting all our money on indie games, sooner or later THOSE will get corporatized too. You don't like what people are making? Stop wasting money on it.

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

@rocka_ Touche. You're right. I just wish gamers were willing to analyze this stuff a bit more. What exactly is supposed to make Super Meat Boy special? I feel like I've seen hundreds of games like it with similar designs that get creamed by critics and gamers for unoriginality. I'm not saying it makes the game bad; I just want people to think about this. I want people to consider that maybe if they're having fun with something, it's not because it's anything unique or original. It's just because it pumps dopamine in their heads. I want gamers to think about the various complaints they make about games and consider how contradictory many of those complaints are.

HaloPimp978
HaloPimp978

I love Super Meat Boy. It's hard and challenging but at the same time it is an awesome and addicting game.

rocka_
rocka_

@mattg90520 Or maybe thats just because people have their own opinion about other people's opinions...I don't know. @cachinscythe Giving someone thumbs down doesn't mean they are insulting you (although I have no doubt some people had that in mind when giving you thumbs down), it means they don't agree with you! Its their opinion about your opinion. And really, what did you expected? You have such a great game like SMB, and you come to a article about that same game, saying you don't see what's so special about it, when you are fully aware that people who do like the game are going to see your comment...what did you expected to happen? You thought you'd get Thumbs up for that?...............

mattg90520
mattg90520

@cachinscythe Thats because a lot of gamers of blind fanboys with unwavering allegiance.

LoZ4life
LoZ4life

one of few games ive actually wanted (needed) to 100%

zeebenzene
zeebenzene

i want the psp2 to have a plethora of pc indie games

Shardz7
Shardz7

I've been trying to figure out Microsoft for about 17 years and I still haven't reached a logical assessment of what they are trying to accomplish other than make mass cash. Given that, retro is huge right now...especially in the Indie realm where all the closet developers are scrambling for low resolution assets and returning to core game mechanics. Gamers are tired of forking out $60 every 6 months for the next [insert clever wargame title here] big game that plays exactly like the last 12 big titles. Games like this and Minecraft were destined for fame because the tides have turned and the corporates have no clue as to what is fun anymore. Brace yourself for next year's 4 bit emulated graphics blitz 'cause it's coming...

cachinscythe
cachinscythe

Wow. Yet another example of gamer intolerance. I said that I didn't get Super Meat Boy on this comment page, and even though I said I meant no offense to those who enjoyed it, my comment still got so many negatives it won't show anymore.

gbrading
gbrading moderator

Super Meat Boy is both infuritating and terrifying and yet very addictive. It hates me, but I kind of love it.

widdowson91
widdowson91

From what I've played Super Meat Boy is a really solid platform game. I've not been a massive fan of the industry this generation, but there's been a lot of indie developers showing games that make the future look a little more promising. I just hope they don't all sell out. Also, to all those criticising Super Meat Boy, saying it'd have been good 10 years ago and not today. Just because its not 3D, or a technical power house, doesn't mean its not a good game. Its better then all the recent Call of Duty and Halo games hands down.

legend157
legend157

everything that he said in the review was true. the game does not have any frustration. it is a VERY hard game but its still really fun. Unlocking characters is one of my favorite things. GO INDIE GAMES!!!!!

widdowson91
widdowson91

@Rickystickyman: Super Meat Boy is no more a 'hardcore' platformer then any Mario game is. If you think difficulty makes a game more 'hardcore' try playing Super Mario The Lost Levels. The original version has no save feature. It makes Super Meat Boy look like a game even a toddler could complete. One game over BANG! You have to start the game again...

Rickystickyman
Rickystickyman

@HuSSaR83 Have you ever played a hardcore platformer? That is what super meat boy is. Mario is a platformer that is for noobs and for little kids that don't how to play games. A hardcore platformer is a platformer that is made to test your skills, and is made to be hard. An example would be I want to be the Guy, or Jumper. Super Meat Boy is a great game that has a lot of indie game references, and a lot of references to other games like street fighter, or castlevania. For super meat boy to be enjoyed at its max you need to get all of the references.

IslandBros15
IslandBros15

Too bad it's not coming to the Wii, I'll just find the PC version.

HuSSaR83
HuSSaR83

I don't know whats the big deal about this game? Regular platformer with graphics from old Mario Bross thats cool till u get to level thats gonna frustrate u till u turn it off. I got this game and play once a while but if this is future of platformers I'd rather play Trine.

pan-cakes
pan-cakes

- Szeiden, you can unlock ninja meat boy late in the game.

gideonkain
gideonkain

I downloaded the demo, that was enough content for me.

GonnaDie4TheGov
GonnaDie4TheGov

Awesome game, i wish this game would have won more awards over that short excuse for a game called Limbo, i was really disappointed in that purchase but with SMB I'm still playing it and loving it. I find it funny that people complain about the game being 20 years too late or whatever but thats what makes this game so fun. The retro platformer is great in quality like this...but I don't want to see a flood of them on the market either

Szeiden
Szeiden

I really need to just buy this game. For some reason the fact that the main character is a piece of meat is preventing me from getting this awesome game. If he were a rectangular ninja it would be an instant buy (because that would be original!). Curse me and my weird reservations.

seinfeld95
seinfeld95

whyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy?whyyyyyyyyyy? why did these r-tards cancel Super Meat Boy for Wii for good? why? i'm gonna poop in ther mouths after they fall asleep! frickin' f@gg0ts!

mcboone
mcboone

overrated, would of been good 10 years ago on a gameboy or something.... cmon its like a slightly improved version of mario or something. its fun, but to me its on the same level as a iphone game or something......

flaxgrass
flaxgrass

could be a neat game on 3ds, I dont know how it would implement 3d but leave it to these guys to come up with something. do the same thing street fighter did, well they have 3d character models, but something like that where it pops out and gameplay remains 2d. im usually the first to complain about control issues but the analog sticks were fine for smb.

lowkey254
lowkey254

so that's why it's not on the ps3. makes sense now.