Angry Birds' take on Mario Kart releases today with $65 in-app purchases

Free-to-play game from Rovio Entertainment releases today across iOS, Android, Windows Phone 8, and Blackberry 10 devices.

[UPDATE] The Android version is now available from the Google Play store.

The original story is below.

Rovio Entertainment today launched Angry Birds Go!, the free-to-play kart racer spinoff of the popular downloadable strategy series. The game is available today for iOS, Windows Phone 8, and Blackberry 10 devices. The Android version is not available at press time.

Like other free-to-play games, Angry Birds Go! is supported by various microtransactions. According to its iTunes product page, users can spend $2.60-$65 of real-world money to buy additional items.

The game was "built from the ground up" as a free-to-play title and features upgradable karts, numerous characters, and special powers in a "fully rendered" 3D world. Gamers can play as the birds or the pigs throughout various game modes like Time Boom and Fruit Splat.

Angry Birds Go! also features connectivity with Hasbro's Telepods, a line of physical toys that can be "teleported" into the game.

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Discussion

86 comments
Senior_Rosa
Senior_Rosa

The game is very entertaining, but kind of easy and simple imho… Nothing like Mario Kart. Apparently you need internet connection to play which limits its usability (specially during trips). Graphically speaking, in my iPad mini it looks fantastic. About the in-app purchases, all you need to do is block them in system preferences if you don't want to risk it. When i saw the price of that kart i almost had a heart attack LOL

thom_maytees
thom_maytees

It would be nice if the trailer did show actual gameplay instead of animation of the racers.

GH05T-666
GH05T-666

oh angry birds, just go away!

wilson2k9
wilson2k9

No mobile game should ever add up to $65 of anything in this modern era of gaming, but that's just my opinion. This looks like something that could make for a great console game, I'd love to see this in full blown next gen graphics.

amdreallyfast
amdreallyfast

I feel kind of sad that mobile gaming is so popular.  I see it as a small pastime but not as full-on gaming.  Plus, I'm not getting money from the market boom.

shakensparco
shakensparco

I really hate how entitled people are about F2P games. "What?! You had a full-time team of programmers who all need money to pay their mortages and support their families... And you won't let me have everything for free?! That's not okay! I'm entitled to the full game because I took the 30 seconds to download it!"

Ayato_Kamina_1
Ayato_Kamina_1

I've decided to not buy a single game if it has microtransactions. I'll play a F2P game with them... but I refuse to buy a game that supports them.

Ashbfc
Ashbfc

I'd rather play superman 64 and i still have nightmares about that game to this day.

mattcake
mattcake

It's really easy. Every time someone you know says "Candy Crush", "Angry Birds" or "Wii", smack them round the face. We will beat the casual gamers one way or another.

bouchart
bouchart

For $65 you could probably buy an SNES, two controllers, a Super Mario Kart cartridge, and a CRT television to play it on, and then spend your time playing, you know, a real game.

kamikazeespleen
kamikazeespleen

Ooh, my new audiovisual entertainment application for a trip to the bog!

jharring
jharring

It seems like microtransactions like these are here to stay.  For example Candy Crush makes at least a million dollars per day for the developer.  Why spend tons of money developing a game when you can just crap out something that uses an established concept, and tap into people's addictive personalities?  You only need 1-3% of people to spend money on the game, and you're set.  Blargh.

kujel
kujel

As a game dev myself I'm against the F2P model and micro-transactions. I will not make games that use either but I also believe in gameplay first so I'm strongly in favor of free to try (ie: demos).


I loved Plants vs Zombies but the second one uses F2P so I passed on it and I'll do the same with any game that tries to for it on me.


As gamers we should all stand up to this kind of crap and only buy games that don't employ it!

The_Gaming_Baby
The_Gaming_Baby

It's sad that more people are going to play this than Mario Kart

Solace427
Solace427

So Heroes of Dragon Age goes as high as $99 and this game goes as high as $65. The word "micro-transaction" really needs to be reconsidered for this.

zintarr
zintarr

Start calling them the Bubba transaction.

Sefrix
Sefrix moderator moderator

No android? Is Java really that difficult for them? O.o 

hystavito
hystavito

@shakensparco I think a lot of people attack F2P from the perspective of honesty.  The more money you ask or the more content you lock away and sell for money, the less it feels free.  I think it's reasonable to argue about to what extent a game that calls itself free actually is.


Of course it's far easier to just call them entitled, and probably for most people a lot more fun :).

amdreallyfast
amdreallyfast

@shakensparco I've seen reviews for well-reviewed mobile games that state, "this game should be free".  Is a fun game seriously not worth $2 to you?  That's insulting to the developer.

amdreallyfast
amdreallyfast

@Ayato_Kamina_1 What about macrotransactions?  Like DLC packs that took several months for the dev team to pound out?  


Note: NOT talking about Day 1 DLC or DLC that is on disc.  I'm talking about post-release.

plaintomato
plaintomato

@Ayato_Kamina_1 I have no problem with a game being worth more, and no problem with DLC as a an avenue to charge more. I'd have no problem paying $100 for a game that was worth it, and if they have to break it out into DLC to make that happen, whatever, as long as the content is worth it.


Microtrans are different thing. Like you said, they ruin the design of the game and result in these ungodly grindfests. Plus they are a bottomless pit...you never really know what value you are getting for your money.


IMO, people who buy microtransaction games are no only suckers, they are enemies of the community, since making a detrimental business model successful actually does ruin it for the rest of us. If your game is worth a hundred bucks, whatever, charge a hundred bucks, but if you include microtransactions for anything other than cosmetic frills, your game isn't worth a dollar.

kujel
kujel

Drop the part about Wii and I'll agree.

skyx26
skyx26

That's a LOT more than 65 bucks...

PeejayYeh
PeejayYeh

@kujel You bet. I definitely agree on your point. I am a gamedev too, and I am wondering why a great franchise like this have to go doing F2P. PvZ2 is not bad, but I don't really get the point of making it F2P. Paid DLCs on the way, AGAIN???? I hate to say this but I am really spent, sick and tired of this crap. The consoles needed it, but PC versions must have Digital FULL expansion packs, as for we are living in the Online Information World today. I had enough of F2P and DLCs.

amdreallyfast
amdreallyfast

@kujel While I don't like microtransaction, I think it is here to stay until the angry gamers get populous enough.  "Angry" can't shout as loud as "money", and in that regard, microtransactions scream really loud.  It is the latest business model, and to be honest, it looks like it beats piracy into the ground.

Ayato_Kamina_1
Ayato_Kamina_1

Agree. I won't touch microtransactions unless it's a F2P game. And even then it has to be a F2P where the microtransactions aren't required or game breaking.

mattcake
mattcake

@kujel I really loved PvZ1 but as soon as I saw PvZ2 was free, I knew what to expect. Now I find myself often in the inexplicable position of having 3 stars on every level, but still not enough keys to open the other areas. What else can I do other than repeat levels for absolutely no reason at all until the game randomly gives me one, or pay for a key... I think I'll delete the game instead. Make a good game and people will pay for it, it's the way it's always been. Soon people will realise the F2P games are all similar and start looking for a 69p single purchase again... I hope.

allever
allever

@kujel I'm with you 110%.  The problem many gamers are facing now is that a lot of game companies are getting onboard with micro transactions. If gamers don't put a stop to it (by not purchasing those games), micro transactions will be here to stay. 

Solace427
Solace427

@Sefrix Android releases are a bit harder to do only because of the different OS version across the various android tablets. The need to makes sure the game runs properly across the board unlike Apple devices which all use iOS for either the iPad or IPhone. So it's more so just that its time consuming than actually difficult. If an android OS was standardized for all android based devices than it would be alongside Apple no doubt but that would take away from the open source nature of Android.

shakensparco
shakensparco

@hystavito @shakensparco You could argue that if the F2P model relies on giving an unfair advantage to players who pay than it shouldn't exist; however is that worse than not letting someone play the game at all unless they cough up $60?


We have two sides of the coin. You can either make a game free for everyone and give an edge to the paying players. And they have the freedom to pay as much as they want.


Or you can have your traditional game that nobody is allowed to play until they pay $60.

But is paying $60 better? Especially when most players probably only stick to the same few guns/vehicles? 


When you look at it like this, the F2P model seems very reasonable. So it is very frustrating for me to see that everyone expects developers to work literally, for free.

shakensparco
shakensparco

@hystavito @shakensparco I don't think that most of the F2P hate is coming from the use of the word "free." I don't believe it's the semantics that is infuriating people. Everyone on this forum probably knows the term F2P doesn't actually mean that. It seems that the real problem is that people expect to be on even footing with those who spend money. But they don't understand that a lot of F2P games won't sell anything if there is not enough of an incentive to buy. And if they can't make any money, then the game can't exist at all.

mattcake
mattcake

@xgalacticax Because the (non) free to play business model these casual games support is infecting "proper" games now too. I want to pay 40-50 quid for a game and get quality. I don't want it for free upfront, and have the gameplay engineered to make me pay to progress or waste my life grinding.

PeejayYeh
PeejayYeh

@Ayato_Kamina_1 He is just pointing on the best games ever made, a.k.a. Real Games, started from the classics: Famicom, NES, SNES, Ninty64, Gamecube, PS1, PS2, and of course PC.


I Would rather buy a a satisfying, compelling, and/or mind-blowing game rather than F2P rushed-out, experimental games. [And I am not referring to Angry Birds Go!]

jharring
jharring

Unfortunately there's enough people out there that can't help themselves and will spend money to gain an edge (the "wallet warriors").  Additionally we "core" games are outnumbered by people who play Farmville and Candy Crush and prove that they have no problems with microtransactions.  Also, young kids are growing up with phones and tablets and see microtransactions as normal as well.  These are ominous times.  =/

shakensparco
shakensparco

@mattcake @xgalacticax


So we should blame casual games for discovering a successful business model? Game companies are not designed to serve the whims of the gamer. Their main goal just like any other company, is to make money.

mattcake
mattcake

@MrOrbitz @xgalacticax Yeah there's only one thing worse than a free game with pay-as-you-go gameplay, and that's a full price one with the same.

MrOrbitz
MrOrbitz

@mattcake @xgalacticax If there's one thing I find absolutely disgusting about the Xbox One launch, It's just how many 60 dollar games with microtransactions there are.

You developers want microtransactions in your games? lower the fucking price of the game then, I mean the least you could do is pretend you're not all money grubbing pieces of human garbage.

amdreallyfast
amdreallyfast

@Sefrix @IncinX My guess is that, to get the game to run, they used a lot of OS-specific APIs, APIs that didn't have close equivalents on Android.  Or maybe it was just a fourth OS that they didn't want to bother with at press time.  I'd put my money on the latter.

Sefrix
Sefrix moderator moderator

@IncinX Oh no I know all about device fragmentation, from screen resolution to old gingerbread OS's. That being said, it's not an impossible hurdle, especially for larger companies like them. Perhaps there was another issue on their end that was unsaid, but I doubt they got hooked up in what OS the work off of or how to handle resolution size changes.

IncinX
IncinX

@Sefrix @maniacalpoet @Solace427 It's more than just the screen size that is the issue.  Solace is correct above, you should read his post again.  It's called Device Fragmentation, google "Android Device Fragmentation" and you will understand the difficulties.

Sefrix
Sefrix moderator moderator

@maniacalpoet @Solace427 Java is arguably the easiest OOP language in existence. Certainly easier to code in than the horror that is Objective C used for iPhone. Anyway this argument is kind of moot when it came out on WIndows Phone as well, which doesn't use Objective C. This I am surprised that it did not come out on Android yet. The only difficult part of programming for android is actually coding well so that the different screen sizes are not an issue.