#1ReasonWhy You Should Pay Attention

GameSpot editors Laura Parker and Carolyn Petit discuss the importance of stamping out sexism in the games industry.

Yesterday, the Twitter hashtag #1ReasonWhy exploded into a tremendous outpouring of stories about sexism encountered by women who work in various aspects of the games industry. Over the course of this correspondence, GameSpot editors Laura Parker and Carolyn Petit analyse the importance of the hashtag, sharing thoughts on what the huge response to it means, and where the industry goes from here.

Carolyn:

The #1ReasonWhy is a rapidly growing collection of tweets from women who work in various facets of the game industry recounting negative experiences they have had in their respective fields.

Of course, stories about sexist attitudes in the games industry are nothing new: it's an issue that has been much discussed this past year. (Take the Kickstarter project by Anita Sarkeesian a few months ago about portrayals of women in video games for instance, which generated a great deal of discussion.) But what was immediately remarkable about #1ReasonWhy to me was the tremendous outpouring of stories and feelings from so many women, this groundswell of frustration and anger from so many sources.

On one hand, it was a painful reminder to me of the reality of just how rampant sexist attitudes and behavior are in this industry, an industry that should, I feel, reflect the fact that games can be enjoyed by all sorts of people, that they can bring people together, that they're certainly not just for men.

On the other hand, it was inspiring to see so many voices speaking out, sharing their stories, standing up and calling for change. I'm kind of flabbergasted by the extent to which the hashtag has exploded. To me, that speaks to long-simmering feelings about a pretty severe imbalance that needs to be discussed and addressed. What was your initial reaction?

Laura:

The swell of support for #1ReasonWhy over the last two days is a sign that things need to change. Sexism in the games industry is something that has been discussed more and more over the last two years, and it's so encouraging to see so many women from all parts of the game industry--developers, journalists, writers--speaking up to support each other and make their voice heard in this debate.

One of the things that became clear from reading some of the tweets--the hashtag has been used over 22,000 times on Twitter to date--is how similar some of these experiences are. Up to now it has been really hard to talk about this issue with a united voice because there are so many different attitudes and views in the industry surrounding how best to tackle sexism and attitudes to women. But the hashtag helped identify where some of these problems lie, and even inspired some industry leaders to take action via the #1ReasonMentor response: a call to arms to help connect young women in the industry to more experienced mentors.

For too long we've merely talked about sexist attitudes and behaviour in the games industry. Talk is good, but we need to take action. This is a step in the right direction.

What do you think should happen next? We can't let this fizzle out. How can the industry come together to make the most of this solidarity? How can this message reach the decision-makers and those who hold the power to incite change?

Carolyn:

It's a difficult question without easy answers, but I think the hashtag gives us some reasons to be hopeful. You mentioned the #1ReasonMentor hashtag that came out of it; this should lead to some connections being formed that result in at least a few more women getting into the industry.

One of the more disheartening recurring themes in the shared stories for me was that of hiring practices that overwhelmingly favor men, maintaining the status quo of gaming as a hugely male-dominated industry. Anything that gets more women involved in designing, writing and programming games is a very good thing. I hope that many individuals in the industry, women and men, are motivated by this organic Internet uprising to find ways large and small to challenge existing attitudes, criticize sexist behavior, and incite positive change.

I also think that those of us in the media have both an ability and a responsibility to keep this discussion going, to find ways to investigate and spotlight systemic imbalances like this. Many #1ReasonWhy tweets I saw were from women expressing a reluctance to speak out and share their stories out of fear of repercussions. That fear is a huge problem in and of itself. It's clear that the hashtag offers only a relatively small glimpse into a deep-seated problem that isn't going to go away overnight. If we in the industry get complacent, it may never go away. We need to keep finding ways to make these stories heard. We need to continue fighting for the idea that gaming is not a boys' club, that it doesn't make long-term sense culturally or financially for developers to exclude women from the creation of games, or to market games in ways that insult and alienate women.

I think the general perception of who games are for is already in the process of evolving. There's momentum that's (much too slowly) taking us toward a more inclusive, more equitable industry; we need to not only keep that motivation going but speed it along when we can. If journalists are aggressive in continuing to cover the problem of sexism in the industry in its many forms, and if people participating in programs like #1ReasonMentor keep the ball rolling, I believe it'll be a better industry ten years from now than it is today. It may sound silly, but I really think it's up to all of us to do what we can.

So hopefully this is, in a sense, just the start of what will be an ongoing discussion. Any last thoughts on this for now?

Laura:

I also hope #1ReasonWhy reached developers, publishers and gamemakers who are responsible for hiring talent in the industry. If influential development studios get onboard and pledge their support for this cause (as Bungie has done as well as Halo 4 developers Bonnie Ross and Kiki Wolfkill) and take some sort of stand to say that they do, and they will, pay more attention to how females in the industry are treated from now on, then I think something really positive can come of this.

I agree the media has a responsibility to keep this discussion going. It's not just the industry's practices that have to change, it's also the attitude of consumers and players. Sites like FatUglyorSlutty really highlight the extent of this problem and send a very clear message: this shit has to stop. You're right when you say that what needs to happen now is that the industry needs to re-analyse the way it makes and markets games. Women cannot and should not be excluded either in the creation of games, or in the way games are marketed.

So everyone has a part to play. Developers have a responsibility to ensure the development industry is an equal opportunity environment where women feel comfortable and valued for their skills; publishers have a responsibility to speak to both male and female gamers on equal terms and not alienate or insult one or the other; and consumers have a responsibility to accept the changes taking place in the gaming demographic and make gaming welcome and accessible to all.

#1ReasonWhy is a step in the right direction. All we have to now is make sure that people pay attention.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Did you enjoy this article?

Sign In to Upvote

0 comments
l777l
l777l

#1 reason why this myriad of terribly and comparably wronged persons do not unite and create their own companies? Well, until that's been figured out, just uniting to complain does seem much more comfortable and less risky.

rarizzl
rarizzl

*See last two posts to see where post begins. You know it's epic and true because it's a trilogy.  

 

1)      An example of how making things “girly” will not fix anything.

Just like most dudes, I pretty much hate Twilight. And no, not just because there’s a female lead, or a love story, or shirtless pretty boys, or a distortion of classic vampire myths or any of that junk, which could be done right and to great effect, but because the books are plain old poorly written, the plot is full of holes, and most of all, Bella is a weak and insulting female lead. I’m a big literature nerd, and most of my favorite writers are women: Mary Gaitskill, Janet Finch, Elizabeth Strout, Alice Monroe, Toni Morrison, so on, and so forth. These authors create dynamic, complex, and powerful women throughout their work while maintaining a clear commitment to craft. Slapping a wig on Mario or just throwing more women up in stuff will not make sexism go away; it’ll just become another way for big companies to plug a demographic and make money off of superficial pandering.  

 

Finally, to sum up my manifesto, I’ll say that I do support the debate and the hashtag, but please people, be reasonable. I’m surprised at the reviewers surprise at the amount of back lash this debate has taken. I mean, not all gamers are college educated, progressive hipsters. For every progressive chick or dude, there are about a mob of twenty backwards folks waiting around the corner, fearing change, lighting torches, sharpening axes. Just like anything else, there are plenty of ignorant folks in gaming, and more fairly, there are plenty of people who just want to play games and not think about the issues. This is all just one big growing pain, and ultimately, a very good sign for these to come, however they take shape.

 

All in all, do things the right way, the fair way, and take it easy sometimes. Belittling others to prove your (sometimes) valid points will not get us anywhere. We’ll get there sooner or later, and it’s not like someone died to give us videogames, right?

 

--Ron

 

rarizzl
rarizzl

1)      Sexism in the work place

Work discrimination based on gender/ethnicity/religion, etc. is just plain wrong and against the law too, but for there to be real substantial change, there will have to be blood drawn and sacrifices made on both sides. I’m sorry, but a hashtag probably won’t cut it. I’m just being realistic. This debate is being likened to the greater argument of sexism in the world at large and the civil rights movement. Not to be grim, but before making these relations, we have to realize that thousands of people died and faced a lot of horrors to end segregation and so on. I’m sorry, and I know this is coming from the black kid, but having a difficult time making it as a female videogame writer is not on the same level as facing slavery, lynchings, poverty, the crack epidemic, etc. It’s just not. Nor is it on the same level of female circumcision, But gender discrimination in the work place isn’t right either. Ultimately, I’m saying that women who are brave enough to speak out will have to face the possibility of being blackballed and so on. (Fair) lawsuits will have to be filed and major, reasonable actions will have to be taken. Yes, the hashtag is a good, necessary start, but it’s not the end all be all. Also, with indie games moving to the forefront in the last couple of years, it’s entirely plausible that women who aren’t accepted by the bigger players in the industry could go and start their own companies and create games more sensitive to female gamers ( and no, I don’t mean making games by women, for women, which in a speaking to that, all I have to say is, does there need to be a black Santa Claus? Can you just throw a wig on Mario?). If you, whoever you are, black/white/female/Hispanic/Islamic/Jewish, etc, want to see more games representing your demographic in an honest way, and this is truly important to you, then put it upon yourself to create these works because it’s unfair and naive to believe anyone will take the time to change their creations just be sensitive to you.

 

2)      A case in point of the wrong way to advocate gender equality

From what I understand (and yes, I am being too lazy to go and dig up all the details. Flame me if you must), there was a game a while back catching some major hatred for not including playable female characters, and in fact, a petition was stated to force the creators to include a female character. To be blunt, that’s just naive, senseless, and the starting squirt in an epic pissing contest. I’m comparing this action to going back and trying to “edit” Huckleberry Finn to be more sensitive to African Americans, which is silly. That book was an honest narrative of the times. Editing out the N word or adding in an elegant and commanding female lead would just be silly. Instead of doing that, we have the Bronte sisters and Richard Wright and Maya Angelou and Junot Diaz and so on and so forth. If you want games with strong female leads, then go make that game. You can’t force others to do so. 

 

rarizzl
rarizzl

 

*my comments are coming in parts, as I've exceeded the word limit. Yes, this is apparently what I do at work sometimes. 

 

 

I guess I’ll jump in the pool. It looks pretty inviting, lol. Considering the question of sexism in gaming, especially if it addresses unfair work practices, is perfectly valid and is overall a good sign for videogames, which is still a young medium (yes, I said medium, hoping that one day videogames could be respected as a serious artistic medium and not just a toy). But I will say that there is a fair, effective way of correcting inequalities, and there is an unfair, ineffective way of correcting inequalities that just turns everything into a juvenile pissing contest on both sides. So I’ll throw out a few thoughts.

1)      Sexism in multiplayer gaming

I’m a young, well-educated, all around nice African American male who enjoys a few online rounds of Tekken every now and again. I have a few online friends that I’ll set up tournaments with, but that’s about it. Without knowing my age, race, or gender, I’ve gotten plenty of silly trash-talking texts from randos, and I either ignore them, or if I’m in the mood, I turn around and say something nasty right back (without pulling the race/gender/ethnicity card, not just good ole’, plain gutter talk). I will never ever own a headset for gaming, or at least if I ever do, I’d only wear it to play with real life friends. Trash talking is just a part of any competitive field, and some people will do whatever it takes to get under your skin. Am I saying racial/gender slurs are right? Hell no. I’m just saying they exist in real life. As a gamer and a human being, one always has a measure of personal responsibility even if others are dead wrong. If online trash talking disturbs you, consider a)growing thicker skin and talking trash right back b) ignoring negative comments c)only plug up the mic with real friends d)don’t plug in the mic at all e)don’t play online.

 

2)      Sexism in portrayals of women

Two things have to be consider in how women are portrayed in videogames: a)Most tropes of female characters in gaming were created by men, and yes, the human tendency (by human I mean male and female) tendency to objectify people who are different probably tainted a whole lot of that. b) Videogames are still a seriously young and fledgling medium, so character portrayals, both male and female, are going to be pretty shallow in a lot of cases. In general, most games follow one dimensional characters that are intentionally flat so the gamer can assume the avatar’s identity more easily. With games growing in maturity and story depth, the character’s are developing emotions beyond “Oh, I got a power-up!” happy face and “Oh, I stepped on a spike!” sad face. We’ve gone from Mario, to Link, to Cloud Strife, to Solid Snake, to John Marston, to the new Lara Croft, with the more recent characters displaying depths of personality. Sexuality is just another part of the growing depth of characters in gaming. So to sum it up, yes, there will continue to be women with bouncy boobs and thongs in video gaming as long as the male demographic (and maybe some females too) is remotely interested in gaming, and beyond any deep analysis of how sex and violence can affect people who either a)have negative tendencies anyway or b)will never have a brain of their own anyway, what’s really wrong with that? (I know, smack me if you must, I’m just keeping it real). Men like skin. Women like skin, as evidenced by all the hunky, shirtless dudes in most modern games. It’s nature. A person secure in their sexual identity and looks could accept the cartoonishly attractive and scantily clad men and women. Hopefully, creating convincing, real characters will become a trend in gaming, and as that happens, we’ll hopefully see stronger female leads as well. 

 

GAME-QUEST-EX
GAME-QUEST-EX

Sexism is an unfortunate fact of life: there are people who mock, taunt, put-down, hold back, or discriminate against women, for whatever ignorant reason. Sexism also exists within the video games industry, in one form or another, I'm sure. I won't excuse, rationalize or justify that behavior: it's wrong and has to stop/change/go away.

 

But how to make that change?

 

GameSpot is a Video Game Site. We can start a conversation about sexism in the game industry, but ultimately where does that lead? Do we blame male programmers, publishers, developers, consumers as being part of the problem? That will lead nowhere, because then the guys will get "defensive" for whatever reason, and what started out as a topic having "positive intentions" ends up becoming an endless argument of hurling insults back and forth at each other.

 

Sexism online is also a problems for some female gamers, and that problem speaks largely to the negative behavior of some people online, who hide behind being anonymous to inflict verbal taunts. Some people are trying to be "funny," others use insults as a "tactic" to throw off their competition, while others are just plain mean. Again, it's the individual's immature personality and character that is the problem and not somehow the direct creation of a sexist, male-dominated game industry. That point has to be made clear.

 

There have been some good video games, which featured relevant lead female characters, that did not have "unrealistic physiques" (games like Heavy Rain, Beyond Good & Evil, Indigo Prophecy etc). Aside from winning a few awards here & there, game like these actually do sell, usually over a long period of time, but obviously not as much as & not as fast as your typical multi-player para-military shooter, which is the popular norm nowadays. That's not sexism, though: it's profit. Online multiplayer games sell and make money because a lot more different people tend to buy shooter titles, so that they can play online against their many "friends." The sold game copies just add up & make a lot of loot for the game-makers

 

When developers do decide to make and release titles with more positive, more "realistic" female lead characters, why don't concerned people buy them, support them & highlight them more online (via blogs, sites, social media, etc) as worthwhile titles to play, instead of spending more of their time trying to beat others over the head with the whole "many of you men are part of the sexism problem in the game industry" argument?

 

In the end, people tend to focus more on the negative, anyway. It's human nature. We all do it at one point or another, not to intentionally be the "bad guys," but more out of habit, or maybe over-reaction.

 

When you try to use force, shame and demands to bring up such a sensitive issue as sexism, especially with the people you want to help solve the problem, the typical response you end up with is defensiveness or eventual indifference towards a significant issue that does need addressing & fixing. It just needs to be pursued in the right way (one way is bringing up and and highlight good video games with positive female leads, as possible examples to follow in the future, because they are such titles out there).

 

Sexism against women in the workplace (like the game industry) is a whole other beast to tame. Negative Attitudes have to change, plus useful laws & policies have to be put into place and enforced (within reason, of course).

 

However, if we narrow topic down some more, to just sexism within video games themselves, try using other games with opposing (non-sexist) themes to address the issue. Such video games can be used to keep the topic relevant to the targeted audience, who are also gamers themselves (provided that they truly interested in the issue, of course).

 

Hey, it's not perfect, but it's a start.

hangman000
hangman000

Whining at it's best.These 2 gave nothing solid on how to stop sexism and they probably copy pasted all this.No i SHOULDN'T pay attention.

THE_DRUGGIE
THE_DRUGGIE

They should have those workplace harassment videos and put a Metal Gear guard alert sound in place of the "STOP, THAT IS SEXUAL HARASSMENT" bit and put in Super Mario music everywhere else.

Problem solved and I expect a king's ransom as my consultation fee.

torrne667
torrne667

Why are we having this debate on a fucking gaming site????? Carolyn or whatever your name used to be, no-one gives a shit. If you wanna have debates about this sorta stuff then go onto a specialist site or go on a march where the majority of people actually give a shit. Seriously, since you came on gamespot all i see is these stupid fucking powertrips/accept me debates. Just review games, thats all people come on here for, game reviews and previews, new technology... stuff like that. Sick and tired of people hijacking sites with their melodramas. Sort ya life out and just live it!

davedrastic
davedrastic

I don't really understand this article, or topic. 

 

I don't see any examples of sexism here. I've looked at a couple of articles from the hashtag, i've read a few of the below comments,  but they've had very specific examples which generally strike me as absurd. 

 

So what if someone is quite adamant that girls don't play, or can't understand games. Let them have their foolish and non-sensical beliefs. What does it matter. How does their ignorance effect you? Does it mean that as a woman you're banned from buying or playing games? No. So where's the problem?

 

Oh so you don't like being made fun of for being a girl gamer. Oh boo hoo. What about every other group that is made fun of for one reason or another. Personally homophobia strikes me as a lot more important than a sexist jibe. Racism. Sizeism. 

 

But perhaps that's because i've never been on the receiving end of a sexist jibe. Apart from all those times i've been called a useless male. 

 

So perhaps the point of the article and the "movement" is about discrimination? About females not having the same opportunities given to them as men do. I find that hard to believe. Again, perhaps because I'm not sexist myself. 

 

Why would a company within the gaming industry be proactively sexist. What purpose would it serve? The gaming industry is part of the same capitalist system as every other industry, isn't it. And from that, each and every company within the industry strives for profit and the continuation of their reputation. So why would any of them hinder that by denying themselves the opportunity to hire the most suitable people for their positions within the company?

 

It makes no sense. 

 

And what does the evidence suggest? When I watch Invisible Walls without fail all (on-screen) participants are male. On the other hand, if I watch the Ozspot - 3 out of 5 of the regular "hosts" are female. Does that mean that Gametrailers is a sexist organisation? No. It just means that the best journalists / presenters that they've found have been male. Is that so hard to believe? Gaming does have a history of being a more male oriented past time, has it not? Perhaps also the presenters have been chosen on how best they will appeal to their audience - and that is something that is prevalent through all media outlets. Is it so bad if Gametrailers make the business decision that a group of male presenters will be more appealing than a group of female presenters, or a mix of both? Why can't they make that decision. Perhaps they haven't at all, but if they had I don't see why its a problem. Perhaps Gamespot have made the business decision to hire more female presenters because they want to appeal more to female gamers - and if they did, is that such a bad thing? We have all female gyms don't we? We have plenty of media that is targeted towards one group or another. It's normal. 

 

But then I guess sexism within the gaming industry must exist because people are saying that it does. And I guess if we all make enough noise then we'll all realise how massive an issue this is and what silly fools businesses have been for not acting in a rational manner. Forget about dealing with sexual discrimination or sexual harassment through the legal system, let's just make a lot of noise. 

 

Look, if there clearly is sexism, can it please be shown that there is. I personally find the discussion a little patronising when there clearly is no incentive for any organisation within the industry to act in a sexist way - certainly in the discriminatory sense. 

 

Are we seriously talking about wether or not swag bags include women sized t-shirts? That might well be a relevant and valid point but even if we were to accept that it is, is it important? 

 

If i've completely missed the point, then could those people that choose to continue with the discussion be a little more specific about what exactly they are discussing. Could they refer to serious issues, not frivolous matters. Could they provide evidence. 

 

I don't see how just saying that there's an issue and pointing at incredibly trivial matters helps anyone. 

 

 

 

 

Jestersmiles
Jestersmiles

O_o what happen to the comment section? Jesus....

ZizzerZazzerZuz
ZizzerZazzerZuz

WOW. One word.. RESPECT.

Sadly the majority of people don't know what that word means and children growing up are not taught it,  otherwise we would not be having this discussion.  First, males are mistreated and disrespected not just females. Second, respect is a two way street: Sorry, but saying there is a major problem with sexism in the gaming industry is NOT respecting the majority of people in the gaming industry who are NOT sexist.  The gaming industry is private sector company's that want to make millions of dollars.  These company's want to hire the best and brightest man or women to make there company the most money possible. Sadly there will always be exceptions; However, sexism along with many other problems in the world don't go away by crying about them and pointing fingers.  That makes you just as disrespectful.

 

Respect is something that needs to be taught at home or in the education system.  As a University grad student I have learned aprox. 50% of what we learn from elementary, highschool and even university is garbage and useless in the real world.  But they never find the time to teach us how to respect each other... So sad

 

One final point, In all my Programming and Computer classes we only had at most 3 girls in a given class (This was only 3 years ago).  Do you think maybe that's the biggest reason why there is more men then women in this industry.  If you look back at all the graduates from college/university from the past 20 years it is mostly males.

jowunger
jowunger

Ths topic is ridiculous and should be deleted. Feminism is the female extremism.

 

 

chipwithdip
chipwithdip

Why can't I reply to people when I want to? Even when I hit "reply", I can't get to the comment...

santinegrete
santinegrete

"Women cannot and should not be excluded either in the creation of games, or in the way games are marketed". Excluded from creation? they shouldn't: some of them helped Left 4 Dead and Portal design, and ... well... you have to be very narrow minded in some extent to say that those games aren't really special. Now... marketed? Imagine if they told me games like Dead Space, Dead Island or Prototype get less bloody to get more girls on purchasing it? Hell-no. Those game may be a gorefest but their identity and gameplay are based on that. I'm not saying girls can't handle violent videogames, but you should just hear and read the biased crap I had to put up to when some of them really think Guitar Hero and Mario are better than Bioshock and God of War just because "they are dark and violent". Everyone has opinions, but not everyone has good criteria. I tried to contribute with some seriousness after mocking this article, so sue me :D

Act_Chill
Act_Chill

Women give a different viewpoint and could help bring innovation to even games like FPS that are meant for male gamers. I don't see many females who play FPS or RPGs. In fact females make fun of me for playing them. So what games do women play and what games do they want to design? If I interviewed a game designer for EA and they said they hate watching sports, playing sports, and playing sport games...would I hire them? Probably not.

Act_Chill
Act_Chill

Men and women like different types of games. People create games that they want to play. That means men will make games for men who dominate the gaming community. This is similar to sports. Women complained about equality and wanted to play in the NBA. The WNBA was created, but there are far more men who watch and support the WNBA than women. Where are all the women who were passionate about having a womens league? They just wanted to complain.  

pidow
pidow

Look people, money is genderless, only fools exclude any part of population while trying to make money.  Women are very capable, their are no reasons for not including women in gaming or any thing else for that matter.  By putting limitation on them, you only limit yourselves.

PapaArchDeluxe
PapaArchDeluxe

The comments are becoming too focused on @Gelugon_baat.  In response to the reply's from my previous post:

 

@Evan21 - "lol, it's hilarious that you actually were sexist in your response trying to speak out against sexism.": 

    Lol, yes I did use irony in my previous post, but the purpose was to give way to a semi-solution. Sometimes for people to truly understand certain things, pros and cons have to be stated in an integrated way.

 

@Dragdar - "what a brainwashed idiot, can't even come to terms with his own thoughts.":

    I'm not brainwashed, and I'm not an idiot; and if you're so much smarter, then why couldn't you recognize that I used irony to help get my point across?  If you're so much smarter, then why did you waste your time calling me an idiot, instead of coming up with a solution for the situation at hand?

 

@Gravelord_Nito - ""women can do so much that a lot of men can not do" - oh pray tell what would those things be?":

    First of all, do as @Synthia said, and "Ask your mother, I'm sure she has at least one idea ;)"; then, come back, and let us all know what she said.

    Secondly, if you don't know at least 1 of "what would those things be", then kid, you need to go to school; get out more; and learn something about the world outside of the 4 walls you sit and play games in.

Evan21
Evan21

I love how the headline talks about "The importance of stamping out sexism in the gaming industry" when they don't mention really how sexism hurts the industry.

bitfinex
bitfinex

I would like to retract one of my previous statements and ask @Gelugon_baat to stay. She/He is providing us with top notch entertainment with his/her utter stupidity.

 

 

 

Evan21
Evan21

Someone needs to explain why this is still on the front page...this right here is why IGN is starting to gain more favor that gamespot. I used to love Gamespot for it's reviews and in depth articles. As of late, it has printed a lot of articles such as this one that seem forced. I find myself spending more and more time at IGN. At least then I can watch IPL instead of hearing two women throwing grammatically poor opinions around. It's as if we've all been trolled by the editors. lol maybe we have, seems like a joke.

Strakha
Strakha

In many ways I don't think women understand what they are asking us to do. Out of the hundreds of thousands of years humanity has been around feminism has only existed for decades. Even today it mainly exists in the west. In the mid east it probably exists even less than it did a century ago in the west. In most other regions this is also the case to some extent. It's our natural behaviour to be "sexist". I believe in chivalry and treating a woman well but women are women and there are certain feelings and attitudes that men will always have that are hard to suppress. Even if they could be suppressed is that really the answer?  You can't fight nature. In the end it always wins.

bitfinex
bitfinex

Does Carolyn even classify as a woman? More like an it.

Ps_Element
Ps_Element

I apologize for not Proof Reading

Ps_Element
Ps_Element

Uhh Ohh! I'll Probably Be Castrated for making Even 1 Comment on this Page, but @#&^ it. This Argument being made here show weak Points for LACK of Validation. What's being presented here is driven by a strong passion that fails to say ANYTHING other than Opinion. The example given like the Link to FatUglyorSlutty is good to the extent that a Simple Solution/action that can be created by those who regulate harassment backed by the terms of use/service on hte nextwork for individual consoles.Points made by the Link to the article of Anita Sarkeesian show both Strengths and weaknesses in the individual points made.  Oblviously I haven't provided a solution or a direct Links to validate my opinionated criticism, however I do this because of my a) disagreement on specific complaints and b) my belief that the video game market should ALLOW games to continue to create separation by directing the appeal to both males or females.  The list of games I've played that are Enjoyed by BOTH sexes seems to be extremely slim.  My nieces for example wouldn't even come near to a FPS. They dont care for "shooting".  But give em a copy of Angry Birds or Gran Truismo, or a Platformer and they on it. Sexism should be regulated in such a way that the games which are directed individually to men and women allow insult and offense to an extent provided by the moral stance of the creators, and those games directed to both sexes to have no offensive material to Either Sex.  If the cultural roles of male and female are to be obliterated, then where will sex appeal fall into play?  It would be necessary for the people of the world as a whole to accept and appreciate same sex and transgender copulation and relationships. Only then would the beliefs and actions toward appeal change and redevelop enough that a society as a whole will accept the comments, jokes and offenses without the feeling of personal offense. 

Newager
Newager

The media has to be aware to this issue. Cause remember, the devs are often blind on issues due to their fixation on selling games only to the biggest portion of the consumer market, and if that is male oriented segment they'd definitely go for it. Being or leaning towards sexism is an acceptable risk for them and that's quite unhealthy.

Many people refuse to care because they've never thought about the what if situation. Living as a male, and you only live once right? there's no chance you'll live again next time as a woman. What if some high fence of acceptability issues stuck only on male gender? In some culture male are laughed at for being in the kitchen seriously cooking (not just hunting and grilling meat) fact is a lot of prominent male chefs are out there. Male that got into fashion design or cosmetic formulation industries can be branded sissies (a lot of Italian tailor working in sartoria are real men, not drag queen). What if certain people got stuck with certain skill set or certain interest that's on the feminine dominated industry? I think stuff like this social role suppose to be balanced out. People should be able to freely choose how they want to live their lives. So are girls with gaming / gamer property why should they receive bad sexist treatment? they've accepted it to be their lifestyle.

Strakha
Strakha

Who let these women out of the kitchen? I don't think that is a sexist question because of how relevant it is. The main value of a woman can be best gauged by their performance in the kitchen or bedroom. Anything else they may be capable of is merely a surprising bonus. I kid or do I? What do you look for in a woman?

priviality
priviality

Wow. These comments are just terrible. If it wasn't for the fact that I was reading these on a computer, I would have assumed half of the statements made here came from the 18th century. Seriously. Stop complaining that men have it bad as well or that all it takes for women to avoid sexism is hard work. Honestly, if that were true, this article wouldn't have existed in the first place.

 

If your comment mentioned anything about how women feel entitled or that men are discriminated against, you should probably grow up.

Evan21
Evan21

Joke of an article. If they want respect they should create an all women production company. They are riding the coat tails of men then complaining about the very person that employs them. Unfortunately they were unable to portray themselves in an articulate manner to make matters worse. It's also ironic that this article is generating exactly the opposite kind of response than desired. Additionally the demographic of the responses proves the market share is dominated by men. This entire article is pointless. Honestly, stop talking about gender, put your name on something appreciated by the industry, gain respect, just like anyone else, black white, female or male. You're not entitled to anything special.

zackcurl
zackcurl

i wonder sometimes (and not apathetically) about what can be done here.  on one hand, i would love to see an all female development studio (a la CLAMP, or something) come together and start producing the kind of work that would make them an asset in the industry.  there are some really talented people in this industry, and i doubt many people understand just how many of them are women.  i honestly think we could see some of the most impressive games of our generation come out of a pairing of many of them; can you imagine if Amy Hennig led a team that included talents like Bonnie Ross, Kiki Wolfkill, or Jade Raymond (i know they aren't the only women in the industry, but for sake of keeping it short...)?

 

in all honesty though, i don't know if that would be the answer, nor do i think that it might change much within the industry itself.  i am afraid, at the same time, that it could even create, in a way, a larger divide between the community in an us-verses-them mentality.  i worry that in a way, some people will never accept the idea that women are capable of the same things men are in this industry, but i think most people will be surprised to know just how many of the games they love have had a positive influence by women.

 

i don't want to harp on specific games, as that's already opinion based, but from a technical and logistical standpoint, Uncharted, Halo, and Assassin's Creed have all been best selling games for a reason, and though it's difficult to say that it is because of the influence of both sexes, it's much harder to say that it isn't.

johnmatrix117
johnmatrix117

This comment section is proof positive of the article's point that gaming culture is both hostile to, and dismissive of, female perspectives. That so many posts wrongly refocus on tit-for-tat, "sexism goes both ways" equivocation evinces the mass male entitlement at the heart of gaming's sexist ways. 

FiRE-MUNki
FiRE-MUNki

I really appreciated this report and would like to see more of a similar nature.

mruizinho
mruizinho

This article is just Breat Cancer, men are affected too for it but we only heard it from women, most men doesnt even know they can suffer from this. All campaigns are focused on women, in a way if i had t i probably dont tell anyone and die to not be judge or people laughing of me... Sry for bad english

mruizinho
mruizinho

How about sexism in porno. Girls are much better paid than men, models are much better paid than male models.

Girls never pay traffic fines, between a pretty girl and a man boss (if male) will always choose the girl no matter how good the guy can be. Hate this feminists, really somethings men have the upper hand others not, that's how life is.

There are so many things that Women have more rights than men, for instance women are not forced to do militar service. Just chill, enjoy your life and dont blame the world.

shanethewolf
shanethewolf

I really think Gamespot is the wrong soapbox for this kind of article. I'm a man, and like most men, I don't care.

 

Go whine elsewhere.

Gravelord_Nito
Gravelord_Nito

typical, feminists that are about equality, only b*tching about what interests them. i will write again, how many of these feminists do you see protesting the male portrayal in shows, where he the husband is the joke of the show, wife calls him an idiot aaaall the damn time, bcs she is all capable, wise and what not.

 

the answer is none. bcs hey, its ok to serve up a double standard like that

Nick_Fury_Shine
Nick_Fury_Shine

This is not the place for such topics. This is supposed to be a website about games, reviews and news on new games. Any discussion on politics, sex, morals, religion, sensitivity and anger managment should just be in a forum or a blog, but not here.

If gamespot keeps the stupid policy to put the general thoughts or convictions of his mentaly limited staff whenever they want, this will contenue to be a breeding ground for trolls, nutjobs and idiots. Its like this every time one of them writes and posts a provocative topic about  something based on personal oppinion. Yes we all have our own oppinions, but not everyone tries to shove it in the face of the person next to them.

Gamespot should be what it says on the tin, not the Human rights beuro.

CaesarIIII
CaesarIIII

Enough with this political activist bull.... WTF is the Farcry 3 review ? I been waiting for 2 days now.......

OHhhhhhh Nooooo..... Don't talk me that you don't going to review it, because is to sexist ...! Please Gamespot ! don't allow your self to go that low!!! For the children's !!!

dmblum1799
dmblum1799

I briefly worked as a consultant at a gaming company (the head guys were from EA), and there no women even working in the company that I can remember. I hope that has improved in recent years.

 

Online you're probably always going to face problems, because of the anonymity factor and the insecurities adolescents have. Certain titles tend to be better than others in the overall maturity aspect, and frankly if you play a MMO on a European server you'll have an overall more polite atmosphere.

 

I've also found game mechanics can improve things: GW2's cooperative play style may be why I've never even heard a negative comment while playing it.

Rivboets7
Rivboets7

Nice article.  I agree that females online are treated badly sometimes but I can say the same for males to.

CallMeDuraSouka
CallMeDuraSouka

Good God I thought there was no way anything would cause quite the shit storm that Sir Danny O'Dwyers "Mount Stupid" on religion caused, I did come here to check out Planetside 2 and Farcry, but got overwhelmingly distracted.

 

So much for the claim that gamers are "fat, lazy, uneducated slobs" except for a "select few", the banter has been enjoyable.

Jake518
Jake518

 @diamondcutr  Dude! Stop spamming the comment section! You're not gonna have a conversation/debate with anyone by posting new comments flooding the comment section!

beast70
beast70

your my puppet and dont even know it keep posting do it

TacticaI
TacticaI

Nice to see the comments here went straight to shit and the previous discussions have ended. Sad, I can't even "Show 50 more". Happy spamming folks. 

lcrava
lcrava

2 females arguing this point here. One uses her feelings to argue with math and the other thinks gender is a matter of opinion. Another 22000 crying on Twitter along similar lines. Unfortunately, there is no way to have a constructive intelligent conversation in either place.

santinegrete
santinegrete

Since I can't take this seriously I'm gonna do some trolling: I hate Gelugon_baat. Oops, looks like I'm not good at it.

CallMeDuraSouka
CallMeDuraSouka

For all of you arguing with GG Baat,  I truly don't know why this person gets a kick out of disagreeing and arguing with everyone or more often just being flat out snide, but watch what you post in regards to this poster, doesn't take kindly to vulgar insults and will have you moderated.